first_img Explore further © 2011 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers working as part of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) at the Cerra Paranal Mountain Observatory in the Atacama Desert in Chile, have succeeded in virtually connecting all four main Unit Telescopes (UTs) at the site, completing a project ten years in the making. Connecting the telescopes together virtually allows for the creation of a single virtual mirror that allows researchers to capture images from space as if all of the telescopes were in fact one giant telescope with a mirror 130m in diameter. Combined, the telescopes are known as the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Connecting the telescopes together was no easy feat, in fact the team had tried last March and failed. To make it all work the facility was built with interconnecting underground tunnels. In those tunnels, an interferometer (and a device with an optical microchip called the Pionier) is used in conjunction with many smaller mirrors to direct light beams from each telescope, adjusting for the slight differences in arrival time due to the different positions of the telescopes on the surface. Connecting the telescopes together improves on spatial resolution and zoom capabilities by a factor of 20.The team had succeeded in connecting various parts of the VLT before, but this was the first time they managed to get all four telescopes connected at once. The VLT is the largest virtual optical telescope in the world and astronomers the world over have reason to be excited about the accomplishments of the ESO as access to the VLT will be offered to both those that work at the observatory and visiting researchers.The ESO is a research group made up of scientists from fourteen European countries and Brazil. It’s been in existence since 1962 and is funded by various state governmental agencies. Its mission is to advance the science of astronomy by providing researchers with state of the art facilities. To that end, it has built some of the biggest and most advanced telescopes in the world.The ESO team believes the new virtual telescope will allow researchers to discern far off objects in the sky with much more detail, providing more insight into such phenomenon as how various entities come together to form new solar systems. The team has also set up a site where those that wish to can take a virtual tour of the facility. A Thousand Papers and Counting: ESO’s Very Large Telescope drives astronomy forwards This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: ESO team succeeds in linking telescopes at Paranal Observatory into giant VLT (2012, February 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-02-eso-team-linking-telescopes-paranal.htmllast_img read more


first_img Brought to you by SCORE Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now 6 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. December 6, 2005 Enroll Now for Free 5 Tips about Electronic ContractsTake note: federal law now makes electronic contracts and electronic signatures as legal and enforceable as those on paper.Consider what advantages e-contracts might have for your business. Some companies will be able to conduct their business entirely on line, often with great savings.Be aware that if you start using e-contracts, you have to let customers know whether paper contracts are available and what fees might apply for the paper agreements.Proceed with caution. The law doesn’t define what an electronic signature is, and e-signature technology is still evolving.Visit this website for more information: the American Bar Association , a site that specializes in legal issues.5 Tips for Ensuring Your Customers’ PrivacyUnderstand that protecting customers’ privacy is essential to maintaining and increasing sales and profits online.Develop a privacy policy, post it on your website, and live by your policy. For guidelines, visit these websites: www.privacyalliance.org and www.privacyrights.org .Put top-notch security systems in place to make sure customer data isn’t lost, misused, altered or stolen.Require that third parties with whom you deal provide similar data security.Don’t provide personal information collected from customers to third parties unless you have explicit permission from the customers to do so.5 Tips for Improving Your WebsiteVisit the sites of other companies to find out what you like and dislike. Do some sites seem to “work” while others don’t?Decide what objectives you want your site to meet. Do you want it to be fun, funny, educational, “cool,” or all of those things?Consider your corporate culture and your company image. Your site should support both.Design or re-design the site to meet your objectives. Unless you have a real expert on staff, hire a consulting firm to do the job.Get feedback. Ask customers how your site can be made more useful to them, and keep making improvements.5 Tips for Marketing Your WebsiteThink strategically. Your website should be a part of your overall marketing plan.Choose a ebsite address (URL) that’s intuitive and easy to remember. Your company’s name (if it’s short) or the name of your main product might work well.Put your web address on all your printed material, including business cards, letterhead, press releases and invoices. Include it in all your advertising.Don’t forget offline media and traditional publicity techniques. Send news releases promoting your site to newspapers, broadcasters, and magazines.Speak at conferences and trade shows, and write informative articles for trade publications. When you do, mention your web address.5 Tips for Getting Noticed OnlineGet your website listed on major search engines, such as Google or Yahoo! Two sites, Search Engine Watch at www.searchenginewatch.com and the Web Marketing Info Center at www.wilsonweb.com/webmarket , offer guidance.Join a “banner exchange,” and trade advertising banners with other websites. Look under “banner exchange” on search engines.Visit sites similar to or related to yours and offer to exchange links with them.Write useful articles for other sites and include your web address.Get more online marketing help from such sites as www.zdnet.com/eweek/ , workz.com and www.bcentral.com .5 Tips on Getting Closer to Customers with TechnologyUse your website to build solid, trusting relationships with customers. Trust helps bring customers back.Enhance communication with customers. Some small business CEOs put their e-mail address on the company website so customers can contact them directly.Don’t forget the basics: Post your company’s address and phone number on your website.Remember that the internet is educating your customers and making them smarter buyers. Keep pace with their knowledge.Respond to e-mails promptly.5 Tips for Managing Virtual RelationshipsMake sure you’re up to speed. Good hardware, software and training are the tools you need to make virtual relationships work.Structure your workday so information can be easily shared, discussed and exchanged.Don’t let the technology get in the way. If e-mail technology isn’t working, quickly default to the phone or a letter.Remember, people do business with people–not machines. Always keep up with your networking contacts.You’ll need another set of skills when you use nontraditional means to communicate: writing must be concise and thoughts must be closely linked.5 Tips on Meeting the Demand for SpeedRealize that the swiftest competitor, not necessarily the smartest, is often the winner in today’s marketplace. Speed is increasingly of the essence, no matter what business you’re in.Respond to sales leads quickly. One small business requires staff members to follow up within the hour, by e-mail, fax or phone.Get comfortable with rapid, strategic decision-making. Five-year planning horizons are out the window.Compress your timetables. One internet startup rolled out its expansion efforts in a reduced-time span of 45 days instead of the originally planned year, beating out competitors.Make speed a part of your corporate culture. Reward employees’ swiftness with stock options, bonuses or other perks.5 Tips on Running a WebsiteFind ways to attract customers. Link up with a variety of search engines so when potential customers are searching for your product, they’ll find your company listed.Make it easy for people to “navigate” your site. Hire a good website designer.Help customers trust you. Provide information on the company’s history, mission, and values.Enable customers to get in touch with you easily–via e-mail, phone and regular mail–and respond promptly.Provide top customer service along with the speed and good prices technology offers. Think about how you’ll keep customers coming back.5 Tips for Taking Your Small Business OnlineYour product line should be able to be delivered economically and conveniently through the mail or over the internet.The web allows you to market to customers outside your geographical location. Your product should appeal to people nation–or–continent-wide.Compare new “technology” costs to current bricks and mortar costs, e.g: rent, labor, inventory and printing costs.Realize that the internet levels the playing ground–you can look like a big company with a great website.Draw visitors to your site cheaply. Establish and grow alliances that’ll hotlink to your site for free.5 Tips to See Whether Your Website Is Up to SnuffSimple, clear and fast–think of your homepage as a billboard. Tell them exactly what they need to know up front.Leave plenty of white space around text. A simple font on a light background works best. Separate wide blocks of text into columns.Sub-headings make for quick reading. Make sure pages are easily skimmed.Let your best customers sing your praises. Display their testimonials prominently on your site.After each update, click through your entire site. Mistakes or broken links will only send visitors away.Brought to you by SCORE , “Counselors to America’s Small Business.”last_img read more


first_imgMay 24, 2017 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. What is the responsibility of a platform such as Facebook to its users?This week, The Guardian published its investigation into the social giant’s content moderation practices, revealing through leaked documents the capricious nature of the task at hand.The documents painted the company’s content moderation as something of a moving target, in which a split-second judgement is often required to decide whether something that is potentially offensive, graphic and even dangerous should stay on the site for purposes of awareness and education or removed entirely. Another cause for concern was how far the line went when it came to what threats that were posted could be considered credible.Related: Facebook’s Content Moderation Rules Are Both Careful and ShockingIt’s a complicated process, but when the engine of Facebook is the personal information that people share with it, it begs the question of what kind of transparency is owed to its users, especially around issues of safety and wellbeing.Monika Bickert, Facebook’s head of global policy management, wrote an editorial for The Guardian in an effort to address those concerns and lay out context when it comes to the changing standards required to make those quick decisions.With regard to that transparency, Bickert noted that while Community Standards are available to all, “we don’t always share the details of our policies, because we don’t want to encourage people to find workarounds.” But the boundaries around what is and isn’t appropriate remain blurry.Related: Why Mark Zuckerberg Runs 10,000 Facebook Versions a Day“These tensions — between raising awareness of violence and promoting it, between freedom of expression and freedom from fear, between bearing witness to something and gawking at it — are complicated, philosophical questions,” Bickert wrote. “Many organisations grapple with them, and there are rarely universal legal standards to provide clarity. Being as objective as we can is the only way we can be consistent across the world and in different contexts. But we still sometimes end up making the wrong call. … We get things wrong, and we’re constantly working to make sure that happens less often. We put a lot of detailed thought into trying to find right answers, even when there aren’t any.”So what can any organization learn from Facebook’s stance?While it’s understandable that you would want to keep proprietary practices under wraps, if a process is constantly evolving, take it upon yourself to keep your users or customers in the loop. Their insights could help refine a messy process or highlight issues that you may not see clearly from the inside. It’s also important to remember that admitting you’re wrong isn’t a death knell — it can put you in a improved position to do better going forward.center_img 3 min read Register Now »last_img read more