first_imgHaryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar on Tuesday said the government has decided to discourage paddy crop sowing as the State was staring at a water crisis due to depleting groundwater level.He said a pilot project will be launched in seven blocks of Yamunanagar, Ambala, Karnal, Kurukshetra, Kaithal, Jind and Sonipat districts, where sowing of maize and ‘tur’ pulses would be promoted by giving incentives to farmers.“The scheme has been formulated keeping in mind the interest of farmers and water conservation. By diversifying the area of non-basmati paddy into maize under this scheme, the total saving of water is expected to be 0.71 crore cm (1 cm = 1 lakh litres of water),” he said, adding that water depletion has led to 60 dark zones in the State, including 21 critical ones in 10 districts.Saves water, powerMr. Khattar said crop diversification is need of the day for the State as it saves water, electricity and improves soil health. “During the 1970s, maize and pulses were major crops in Haryana, but they have been replaced by water-guzzling crops such as paddy and wheat. To revive the old maize or pulses area, immediate crop diversification of paddy by maize and pulses is our priority,” he said.“Under the new scheme, the identified farmers will be provided seeds free of cost. Apart from this, a financial assistance of ₹2,000 per acre will be provided in two parts. The maize crop insurance premium of ₹766 per hectare will also be borne by the government under the Pradhan Mantri Fasal Bima Yojana. Also, the maize produce will be procured by government agencies such as HAFED, Food, and Supply Department at Minimum Support Price. Likewise, ‘tur’ seeds will also be provided free of cost to the farmers along with financial incentive,” he said.The Chief Minister also attacked the Delhi government, saying that arrears of ₹100 crore were outstanding against it for the supply of surplus water through the Yamuna river.last_img read more


first_imgThe 2013 X-Blades National Youth Championships will also host the annual Trends of the Game workshop on Thursday, 12 September.  Presented by Australian Women’s Open coach, Peter Bell and Australian Mixed Open coach, Micheal Lovett, this interactive and practical workshop will allow National Youth Championship coaches to observe practical Talent and Elite skill demonstrations and drills. For more information please see attached flyer, and be sure to register your attendance via email to tara.steel@austouch.com.au by Friday, 6 September. Related Filestrends_of_the_game_-nyc_skills_workshop_flyer__2_-pdfRelated LinksTrends of the Gamelast_img


first_imgIn order to create a holistic approach in striving towards these strategic targets, the 2016/17 Targeted Growth Program (TGP) funding will focus on providing affiliates with the financial resources to grow or start up junior competitions.The TGP provides affiliates with the opportunity to put forward their ideas for growth and development within the Touch Football community with a specific focus on junior participation.The TGP also aims to provide TFA with the opportunity to work closely with affiliates in assisting them to achieve their goals for growth and development. For further information on the TGP please read the attached documents below. Please contact targetedgrowth@touchfootball.com.au for further information. Targeted Growth Program WebinarsTargeted Growth Program Webinar 1Date: Wednesday 20th JulyStart time: 7pm, AESTFinish time: 8pm, AESTAccess link; http://events.redbackconferencing.com.au/c1bab4Targeted Growth Program Webinar 2Date: Thursday 21st JulyStart time: 7pm, AESTFinish time: 8pm, AESTAccess link; http://events.redbackconferencing.com.au/2bec39Please note that both webinars will contain the same content. Attendance at both webinars is not required. Instructions:1) Click on the access link to register for the webinar. This is FREE and the main purpose is so TFA can have an understanding of who participated in the webinar. Registration can be done at any time prior to the webinar commencing.2) Once you have registered you will receive a confirmation email. Please read this carefully to see how you can add this webinar to your calendar, how to check your computer systems compatibility to the webinar and importantly how to join the webinar.       3) To join the webinar click ‘Join Now’ on your confirmation email.4) You will then need to enter the email address you used in the registration process to join the webinar.Should you have difficulties with this process please email targetedgrowth@touchfootball.com.au or call 02 6212 2820 Should you miss one of these webinars, are unable to join for a certain reason, or the registration process means you miss part of the webinar (remember that the registration process can be completed at any time prior the webinar commencing) please email targetedgrowth@touchfootball.com.au as there may be opportunities to arrange further webinars. Related Files2016-17_tfa_-_targeted_growth_program_funding_application_form-docx2016-2017_target_growth_program_summary_document-pdftargeted_growth_program-_faqs_and_tfa_clarifications_v2-0-pdfRelated LinksTargeted Growth Program Touch Football Australia (TFA) has entered a new strategic cycle in 2016-2020 with three of the key strategic targets being 1,000,000 participants, 15 percent penetration into the school and junior market and 400 affiliate locations around Australia.Touch Football Australia and its Board has made significant investment into the school and junior space for this cycle, focussing on the following programs:·         Field Officer WorkforceEnabling state bodies and their affiliate’s access to a workforce who are able to promote and deliver Touch Football programs in schools across Australia.·         Ambassador ProgramEncouraging growth and unity within the TFA workforce in a collaborative effort to promote and deliver the sport of Touch Football.·         Improve Resources and MarketingDeveloping resources that facilitate the delivery of Touch Football within school and affiliates as well as create targeted marketing material for more efficient promotion. ·         Targeted Growth ProgramOutlined below last_img read more


first_imgBournemouth boss Howe admits injury crisis likely to lead to new signingsby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBournemouth boss Eddie Howe admits he could be forced into the January market for a new defensive signing.Bournemouth may need to make transfer window moves if Nathan Ake’s injury is a problem.The Dutch defender suffered a hamstring issue at Old Trafford and was withdrawn during the 4-1 defeat.Out of form Bournemouth are already without Simon Francis, Lewis Cook, Dan Gosling and Adam Smith due to knee problems.“I need to speak to Nathan and the medical team but it looked like a hamstring concern,” said Howe. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img


first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your say ​Bournemouth boss Howe has no regrets over Defoe signingby Ansser Sadiq10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveEddie Howe does not regret signing Jermain Defoe.The former England international is heading to Rangers on an 18-month loan deal, per Sky Sports News.And despite the fact he had a limited impact in his stay at the Cherries, Howe does not feel the transfer was a mistake.”The deal (signing Defoe) has been a good one from our perspective, I would do it again in a heartbeat,” he said in his press conference.”He scored some massive goals for us last year, I don’t think anyone should forget that.”Then you add the other value that he brings in the changing room and on the training pitch. He’s definitely been a role model for a lot of our younger players. As I say it’s something I would do again and again if given the same circumstances.” last_img read more


first_imgCarroll says Newcastle deserved win over Man Utdby Paul Vegas18 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveAndy Carroll says Newcastle United deserved their win over Manchester United.Debutant Matty Longstaff scored the only goal of the game.Carroll said, “We’re buzzing! I think we deserved it – we were the better team throughout. You couldn’t write Matty’s goal. It’s his first Premier League game alongside his brother against Man United at home and he’s scored the winner. You can’t ask for any better and I’m absolutely delighted for him along with the rest of the lads.“The lads are buzzing for him. Matty’s a great lad who has worked hard. He’s deserved his start today and kept his head down. He’s grafted since I’ve been here and he deserved his chance and taken it with both hands.“I think it just shows what we have got in the squad. It was terrible last week and we’ve bounced straight back. We’ve worked very hard all week in training, and it has shown today as we dominated the game.“It’s important to show what we are about after last week. When you play a top team like (Manchester) United, it’s always going to be a tough game but when you haven’t won at home and you’re struggling, like last week, I think it’s a great win all round.“The morale in the dressing room right now is great and we are buzzing heading into the international break. It’s nice that we can celebrate for a couple of weeks and it eases the pressure on us. It’s good going into the international break with a win rather than a defeat!” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more


first_imgESPN College Football Playoff top 2015.ESPNWe’re now less than two months away from the start of the 2016 college football season. Get excited, people. In anticipation of the start of the upcoming season, let’s take a look at what ESPN’s preseason top 25 looks like. Can anyone but the defending national champions be No. 1? Nope. ESPN has the Crimson Tide at No. 1 heading into the season. Do they have it right?Here’s the full top 25.  Will Alabama get some more rings this season?Will Alabama get some more rings this season? 1. Alabama 2. Clemson 3. Michigan 4. Florida State 5. Oklahoma 6. LSU 7. Stanford 8. Notre Dame 9. Ohio State 10. Tennessee 11. USC 12. Georgia 13. Ole Miss 14. Oklahoma State 15. Michigan State 16. Washington  17. Houston 18. North Carolina 19. Oregon 20. TCU 21. Texas A&M 22. UCLA 23. Iowa 24. Miami 25. Louisville[ESPN]last_img read more


Again, not every DNF or DQ is a crash, and research has shown that per-run injury rates are still highest in the speed disciplines (downhill and super-G) versus the technical ones (giant slalom and slalom). This jibes with common sense: Although it’s easy to get disqualified for missing a gate in slalom, those miscues don’t always result in terrifying crashes. Making a mistake at the speeds involved in downhill, on the other hand, can have more devastating consequences.All of this is worth keeping in mind while watching Olympic races over the next few weeks. Some of the most seemingly terrifying sports can actually rank among the lowest in terms of on-course incident rates — although what few mishaps there are tend to be quite dangerous. Meanwhile, anything can happen in the most technical skiing events. As it turns out, hurriedly weaving down an icy slope on skis is difficult to do without skipping a gate or crashing. Who knew?— Ella Koeze contributed research. In addition to skeleton and bobsled, luge is another sport that seems prone to disaster, with its high speeds and steeply banked turns. However, roughly 96 percent of competitors end up finishing their runs unscathed, an even better rate than bobsledding can claim.4That doesn’t mean luge isn’t dangerous, of course. At the 2010 Olympics, amid concerns over an excessively quick course, Georgian luger Nodar Kumaritashvili died after a crash in practice. Short track speedskating, by comparison, has a more deserved reputation for mayhem, with nearly 9 percent of runs ending prematurely — though the list of offenses that can get you disqualified from a race is fairly lengthy. On the short track, crashes and chaos are features that add to the excitement.But the undisputed king of ending athletes’ races prematurely — and thus dashing gold-medal dreams — is Alpine skiing. Since 1994, nearly a third of all ski runs have ended without the racer actually crossing the finish line. And the breakdown within the sport varies pretty heavily by event: Perhaps surprisingly, the lightning-fast downhill discipline has skiing’s lowest rate of incidents, with only about 10 percent of runs going unfinished. That number would still be higher than any of the sports we looked at above, but it’s low compared with other familiar high-speed activities such as NASCAR (where 16 percent of individual races ended in a DNF last season) or Formula 1 (24 percent). Downhill takes tremendous speed, skill and courage, and we’ve all seen what can go wrong when a racer makes a mistake, but those moments are still rather few and far between by Alpine standards.DNFs and DQs become much more common, however, in disciplines featuring tighter turns and more gates — those pesky markers that a skier must navigate around to complete the course. Whatever the discipline, failing to send the tips of your skis (plus boots) inside of a gate will get you disqualified from the race.In the super giant slalom (or “super-G”), racers gather speeds comparable to those seen in downhill, but they also must make sharper cuts around more gates, which are bunched more closely together. (They also aren’t allowed practice sessions beforehand, which doesn’t help matters.) Between the men and women, only about 78 percent of Olympic super-G runs are completed cleanly.And super-G is not considered a “technical” skiing event. Giant slalom is, and it involves even more gates and more side-to-side turning. Since 1994, a third of Olympic giant slalom runs ended in DNF or DQ. But the ultimate tough-to-finish Alpine discipline is the standard slalom, with skiers zigzagging back and forth across the slope around pylon-like gates in rapid succession. Almost 50 percent of slalom runs fail to cross the finish line, a testament to the perfection required to clear every gate at world-class speed.Nothing in slalom is guaranteed. For instance, even in successful runs like the one that clinched the gold medal for the great U.S. racer Mikaela Shiffrin at the 2014 Olympics, disaster is always lurking around the next gate: At one point midrace, Shiffrin’s left ski lost contact with the ground, requiring an expert recovery to avert a missed gate — or worse. Tianyu Han of China and Yuri Confortola of Italy, at right, crash during men’s 1,500-meter short track speedskating qualifying during the 2018 Winter Olympics. Richard Heathcote / Getty Images At the climax of everyone’s favorite bobsleigh-based film, 1993’s “Cool Runnings,” disaster strikes the upstart Jamaican team when its ricketty sled flips over during the final race. Everyone from Calgary to Jamaica fears the worst — but the teammates shake off the wreck, determined to finish the race. Together, they hoist up the sled on their shoulders, carrying it over the finish line. Cue that inspirational slow clap.It was a real thing that actually happened … well, aside from a few bits of artistic license. (For instance, they never carried the sled; the fact that all four racers walked away from the crash at all was remarkable enough, given how it looked in slow motion.) But one of bobsledding’s most iconic moments was also a total rarity. As far as Winter Olympic sports go, bobsled has one of the lowest rates of in-race mishaps, with racers completing roughly 95 percent of their runs. In other sports, by contrast, finishes aren’t anywhere near as guaranteed — we’re looking at you, Alpine skiing.To measure how often a run goes awry, we grabbed data from Sports-Reference.com’s Olympics site going back to 19941The year the Winter Olympics switched to its current cycle. for events in nine timed sports: skiing (Alpine and cross-country), skeleton, luge, bobsled, speedskating (short and long track), biathlon and Nordic combined. For each event, we tracked how often it ended in a DNF — “did not finish” — or a disqualification.To be sure, not every DNF or DQ represents a crash like the Jamaicans suffered in 1988.2Technically, they were disqualified for the wreck. For example, in skeleton (you know, the one where you slide face-first down an icy track at stomach-churning speeds), the only DNF or DQ happened not on the course but when Canadian racer Mike Douglas was late for a pre-race inspection.3It should be noted that, before 2002, skeleton had appeared in only two Olympics: 1928 and 1948. The sport was reintroduced to the Olympics in 2002. But DNFs and DQs do usually correlate with the difficulty in staying on course and avoiding spills, missed gates or other sources of misfortune.Since 1994, these are the winter sports with the lowest (and highest) rates of DNFs and DQs among the timed events in our data: read more


In layman’s terms, the Nets have essentially adopted the same offensive principles as the analytically friendly Houston Rockets, coached by Atkinson mentor Mike D’Antoni. (Fitting that these clubs combined for an NBA-record 106 3-point attempts in a game last week.) Russell, who leads starting ball-handlers with 61.5 pick and rolls per 100 plays, will run you around screens all day, and he and his Brooklyn teammates generally avoid midrange shots, instead probing for much higher-percentage looks. No NBA team has driven to the basket more than the Nets, and this would mark the third consecutive season that Brooklyn ranks in the top 10 in free-throw rate.Defensively, the story is much the same. The Nets have excelled at forcing opponents to walk the analytics plank, ranking among the top five in 2016-17, 2017-18 and again this season in terms of how often they coax teams into longer midrange 2-pointers. When teams are fortunate enough to get to the basket, they’re often met by 20-year-old Jarrett Allen, a big man who has erased some of the game’s biggest names at the rim while sometimes playing a one-man zone. The Nets also rank near the top of the NBA in boxing out, to finish those defensive possessions.That combination — continuing to take the most efficient shots possible on offense while taking those same shots away on the other end — has been the NBA equivalent of Andy Dufresne’s rock hammer in “The Shawshank Redemption.” The team’s strategy and talent, combined with its newfound maturation in the clutch, have finally set it free.Brooklyn basically looked shackled at the ends of games last year and at the start of this season. Whether it was inexperience, consistently bad whistles or a combination of the two, the Nets were managing to find new, devastating ways to lose close contests each night.But even that’s changed of late. The Nets, who were a dismal 4-10 in clutch situations as of Dec. 1, have since gone 11-4 in those same scenarios.One noteworthy shift there is rooted in Russell and Dinwiddie’s ability to coexist during the hot streak — something that had consistently backfired from a net-rating standpoint over the past two seasons. (Their ability to play together, or lack thereof, will be worth watching because of the decision the Nets have to make about the future of Russell, who’s a restricted free agent this summer. Yet it looks like Russell will have the show to himself, as Dinwiddie, who just signed a three-year, $34 million extension, could miss considerable time with a torn ligament in his thumb.) But other elements also stand out. Joe Harris is one of the NBA’s best perimeter shooters. Latvian forward Rodions Kurucs was a great find and is a fluid scorer at 6-foot-9.While the Nets are clearly ascending, they still have their issues, too.Brooklyn has one of the highest turnover rates in the league. The Nets can occasionally find themselves with matchup problems against teams with floor-spacing bigs because of how Allen anchors himself to the paint on defense. The lack of pressure on pick-and-roll ball-handlers hurts their ability to force turnovers. For how well the team gets to the stripe, Russell, its leading scorer, takes fewer free throws than any other volume shooter in the NBA.1This includes any player taking at least 15 field-goal attempts per game. Injuries have nagged Brooklyn all year, and while it’s fair to expect a boost from players if and when they return — especially from LeVert — key players’ roles may have to shrink to accommodate everyone once they’re back. And the Nets, who have enjoyed one of the easiest slates so far, will be thoroughly tested by their upcoming schedule — especially from mid-March to the end of the season.There’s a reason we hear so much about the Nets eventually landing a player like Kevin Durant, Kawhi Leonard or Jimmy Butler. Aside from the fact that they’re one of few big-market teams that seemingly has a direction, a blank-enough canvas (in terms of not having a star) and cap space to make something happen, they also would become an instant contender by adding someone of that caliber. Again, the decision on Russell could complicate that. Yet the reality is that getting past the second round likely requires more than this current cast, even at full strength.For the time being, though, it has been eye-opening to watch the 22-year-old Russell play this well since the turn of the new year, a span in which he’s averaged 24 points and nearly eight assists on 49 percent shooting from the floor, along with his rainbow-arc triples falling at a 44 percent clip.While he’ll never possess the sort of bounce that some of his counterparts have, the former No. 2 overall pick has leveraged the threat of his pull-up jumper into being able to beat defenders to certain spots. When he senses defenders on his hip, he’ll often make use of ball fakes to buy himself more space before shooting.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Russell.mp400:0000:0001:22Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.He’s been more consistent with the ball during that window, too, passing teammates open while logging a 3-to-1 assist-to-turnover ratio in 2019 — up from 2-to-1 earlier this season and much better than his career ratio of 1.5-to-1 coming into the 2018-19 campaign.Certain elements of Russell’s offensive run lately, much like the team’s overall, are going to come back down to earth at some point. But with how hellish things have been in Brooklyn for much of the past five years, and with how sound the team’s strategy has been in digging out of that trench, Russell, the Nets and their fans all have ample reason to be enjoying this — even if they aren’t exactly sure what comes next.Check out our latest NBA predictions. For more than four years, the Brooklyn Nets had been more or less irrelevant on a national scale. Whenever the team came up in a larger conversation, it was usually to discuss how one of its first-round picks — dealt in that infamous trade for Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce — was benefiting another franchise that got to reap the draft payoff. You have to go back to 2013-14, a full season after the Nets left New Jersey for Brooklyn, to find the last time they finished .500.All of which makes the Nets — winners of five straight and co-owners of the NBA’s best record over the past month and a half — so compelling. At 26-23, the team is currently holding a playoff position in sixth place in the East. Coach Kenny Atkinson, again, is finding enormous success with his point guards, including D’Angelo Russell, who’s in contention for an All-Star spot. And the club, which in early December was mired in an eight-game skid and couldn’t hold late-game leads, is all of a sudden unbeatable in the clutch. And this is after Brooklyn lost perhaps its best all-around player, Caris LeVert, to a brutal long-term injury.But underneath all that past losing — and there was a lot of it, given that this team has had three consecutive seasons with fewer than 30 wins — there were several road signs that the Nets were tapping into an array of good strategies to begin a turnaround.Much of that was rooted in ideology and experimentation, necessities because of how bare the draft-pick cupboard was for a while. The team had to take some creative steps (read: accept salary dumps) in a bid to get some talent on its roster. And the club’s front office, led by Sean Marks, had to identify talent that was being ignored or undervalued, like guard Spencer Dinwiddie, and trust its own ability to help develop players like him into everyday rotation pieces.The hiring of Atkinson, a longtime NBA assistant, was a key catalyst. Well before the wins started outnumbering the losses, and before there was enough talent to expect playoff berths, the 51-year-old quickly began changing the team’s shot profile on both ends of the floor.During the 2015-16 campaign, a year before he came on, the Nets ranked 26th out of 30 in quantified Shot Quality, which measures the likelihood of shots going in, if taken by an average NBA player, according to stat database Second Spectrum. The club completely overhauled that at the start of Atkinson’s tenure, though, as Brooklyn finished fifth and fourth in 2016-17 and 2017-18, respectively. And this season, the Nets rank ninth in the metric. read more


Ohio State’s women’s volleyball starting lineup stands together prior to the game against No. 5 Minnesota on Oct. 18. Credit: Rebecca Farage | Lantern ReporterAfter being on the road for the last two weeks, the Ohio State women’s volleyball team (14-13, 7-9 Big Ten) will return to St. John Arena to host No. 5 Nebraska (22-4, 15-1 Big Ten) at 6 p.m. Friday and Iowa (17-12, 6-10) at 8 p.m. Saturday.With Nebraska currently riding nine-match winning streak, the Buckeyes have a tough match on their hands. Nebraska has only lost one Big Ten match to No. 12 Wisconsin.Ohio State head coach Geoff Carlston recognizes that Nebraska is one of the best serving teams in the conference and admits the Buckeyes have struggled in that area with this season.“We’ve done well against them, but they’re playing really well right now,” Carlston said. “We have to battle in the serve-and-pass game, so if we can do what I know we can do serving-wise then it gives us a little bit more advantage.”This will be the first meeting between Ohio State and Nebraska this season. The Buckeyes have beat the Huskers in three of their last four matches. However, Ohio State has only beat Nebraska once at home since both teams started playing in 1978. The Cornhuskers hold a 11-7 record against the Buckeyes in the all-time series.Though the Buckeyes have won 62 of 73 games against Iowa, they couldn’t pull out a win last week when they lost 3-1 to the Hawkeyes. The game ended Ohio State’s 15-match win streak against Iowa. The Hawkeyes have one of the top defensive specialists in the conference, senior Annika Olsen, who leads the Big Ten with 4.89 digs per set.The Buckeyes have struggled to maintain their momentum this season. Mauer admitted that while they did not always have a consistent flow, they have been able to adapt to the changes on their own team as well as on the other side of the net.“We don’t give up,” Mauer said. “I think we’re one of those teams that don’t let a ball drop and I think we’re just very scrappy and we make the other team work for it.” Carlston said he believes his team can be a little more disciplined in its plays and how it handles the ball.“[We need to] make [Nebraska and Iowa] earn every single point, like get in there and roll up our sleeves, blue collar defense and relentless pursuit of the ball,” Carlston said. “When we get a block we need to take advantage of that and run our offense behind it.”Mauer has recently had to step up as the starting setter of the team with junior setter Taylor Hughes sidelined with a season-ending injury Hughes.Carlston did not provide specifics regarding the injury, but said Hughes has been trying to work through it while mentoring Mauer and being another set of eyes for the team.“She’s our emotional leader. She’s our quarterback. But she’s also mentored Becca very well,” Carlston said. “Becca, as has happened a lot with us this year, she steps up and she’s doing a great job.”Though the multitude of injuries to the team has depleted Carlston of several starters, the absences have provided the freshmen on the team with an opportunity to start at an early age.“It’s kind of fun because we’re getting better every single day,” Carlston said. “It’s almost like a whole new season with our group because it’s just so different than maybe we were in August, September, even October.”Although the team has had to work through injuries and adjustments, Carlston is confident the team can fight through these next two games and make it to the final tournament.“We’re trying to keep that in mind, that we control our own destiny,” Carlston said. “But we know we have to play and we have to … fall in love with the process again which is hard to do here late in the season.” read more