first_imgLife is made up of love. Period. Full Stop. In the end, there won’t be anything more valuable to you than your closest relationships. The sooner you start behaving that way, the better your life.The story of your life is the story of your relationships.There is no more powerful tool when it comes to influencing other people than truly caring about them. It is unmatched in its power. It cannot be faked.The fastest way to show another person that you care is to listen to them, to give them your full focus and attention.All relationships, whether in business or in life, are built on a foundation of trust. Honor trust, and you honor the relationship. Violate trust and you dishonor the relationship.If you want to accomplish something with your life, do something to help other people. Great or small, it doesn’t matter. If it affects one life, you have made a difference. There is no greater accomplishment than helping another person in need.Relationships require care and feeding. They take an investment of time and energy. You can’t have as many relationships as you would like, and you likely have more than enough.Most relationships die of neglect, complacency, or a violation of trust.We are all more alike than we are different. Most of what divides us is manufactured.Scarcity isn’t real. People that believe that scarcity exists are consumed by fear. Treat them with kindness and compassion.Very few people are truly evil. When they do something that you don’t agree with or understand, it is almost always due to a lack of resourcefulness and a lack of understanding that there are better options. Don’t assume evil intentions where none exist.We touch each other for good or for ill. If you want to be happy, you will build others up instead of tearing them down.You can want something for someone, but until they want it for themselves, you will be miserable trying to convince them to want for themselves what you want for them. You don’t have the right to impose on someone else what you want for them.It is wrong to impose your perceived limits on other people. Support them in living their dreams, even when you think their dreams are crazy.It’s wrong to write people off. If you love them, stand and fight. But when other people make you feel bad about yourself, part as friends and move on with your life.Give other people the same forgiveness that you hope that they will extend to you. It’s likely you need it.If you are frustrated with someone else, it isn’t his or her behavior that is frustrating you. It’s your lack of resourcefulness in dealing with their behavior or it’s that you are investing too much meaning in their behavior.Most of us spend too much time fighting over things that aren’t important and too little time fighting for what is.Leadership is an act of love. It’s the act of serving others and helping them to reach their full potential.The greatest results you will ever achieve you will achieve with and through others. You accomplish more with others than you can ever hope to accomplish alone.Great leaders have muddy boots. They lead from the front. Those who you serve as leader will follow what you do, not what you say.It’s the leader’s job to protect the healthy culture they create from harm. The results you produce as leader are the results of the culture you create.Negativity is the only cancer that is spread by contact. You have to remove the cancer as soon as you identify it, or the healthy culture you create will be lost.Moral authority is far more powerful and effective than formal authority.If you want people to produce results, give them the mission and let them find their own way to complete that mission. Their initiative is more powerful than your directives.There are few things that do as much to make deposits in relationships as saying thank you.It’s a leader’s job to catch people doing things well and visibly praising those behaviors.Be grateful for the gifts you have already been given. There may not be a bigger sin that squandering the gifts with which you have been blessed.The fastest way to claim value is to create it for others. The rewards that flow to you flow to you in direct proportion to the value you create for others.The only permission you need to succeed comes from you. You give yourself the greatest gift when you give yourself permission.Saying “no” to small things is necessary so you can say, “yes” to larger things.Do the most important thing you need to do each day first thing in the morning. It will get done, and the rest of the day will feel like coasting down hill.One of the primary obstacles to success is fear. Mostly fear of failure. You will fail on your journey. Instead of fearing it, expect it, embrace it, and let the lessons you’ve learned improve you.Another major obstacle to success is a failure to do the work. Countless great ideas have died of neglect and inaction. Countless lesser ideas have succeeded through the shear force of effort. Do the work.Another major obstacle to success is discounting the value of your ideas. Your ideas are worth far more than you know. But they are meaningless unless you share them and take action to bring them to life.Success isn’t certain. It isn’t fast. And it isn’t a straight line. But its pursuit is it’s own reward.After caring, the greatest of all human attributes is resourcefulness. There is nothing that man can think of that he can’t bring to life and make reality, given a long enough time line.Everything you do is tied to your identity. Change your identity and you change your results. You need to be the best version of yourself.Most people suffer from having a too small vision of themselves. You’re bigger than your present vision.You will either listen to your inner critic or your inner motivational speaker. The quality of your life and your results will depend on which voice you listen to most often.The only real limits to what you can accomplish are the limits that you set for yourself. You are capable of far more than even you can imagine.Success comes with a price. You can’t have what you want until you pay that price in full. Figure out the price and pay it.Success comes with another price: the price of delayed gratification. To have what you want, you will have to make sacrifices.You capacity to succeed is limited by your capacity to deal with fear, stress, and uncertaintySuccess is incremental. Progress is made over the course of days, the course of weeks, the course of months, the course of years, and the course of a lifetime. And the measure will still be made in the measurement of your relationships. See number 1. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Today I turn 45 years old. Here is what I know after 45 trips around the sun.last_img read more


first_imgThere is no greater investment that you can make than the investment you make in yourself.There is no greater return on investment on Earth that is greater than the ROI on books. I don’t care what the price of gold, oil, water, real estate, or pork bellies is right now, the return on investment from a single book outstrips all others. On the shelf behind me are a half-dozen books, let’s call it $150 worth of books in hardcover when I bought them. Those half-dozen books have helped me generate literally hundreds of millions of dollars in sales. The ROI is incalculable . . . and still growing.I’ve been fortunate enough to have received a formal education. The price of a college degree, a degree from law school, and a masters degree are individually staggering, let alone collectively. But the price of the diploma isn’t the real price. The real price you pay for an education is measured in the time you spend reading the books and trading and arguing big ideas with a group of smart people. It’s a lot of money, but you can and will get the money back and more. But will you really invest the time to sharpen your thinking skills without the formal education? The truth is that most won’t. The return on the time invested getting an education pays dividends for the rest of your life.Whenever I want to learn something, I find a coach with the skills and the track record to bend the learning curve in my direction. I pay them to coach me. The money that I spend with a coach speeds my time to results. A coach looks at what you are doing and shows you the distinctions you can’t yet see for yourself. A good coach holds you accountable for making changes. The faster acquisition of the skills and the speed to results makes coaching very inexpensive. Pay somebody.Consulting is another investment with an outsized return on investment. You are literally paying for someone to help you discover the right choice for your business. Consultants are expensive. But the price you pay for not knowing what you need to know is more expensive (If you sell insight, this is true for your clients too, isn’t it?).Right now I am listening to two audio programs. I paid $497 for one program and $297 for another. The two programs combined total about 30 hours of content. I made a life-changing distinction on the first track of the first program. I’m also signed up for a professional development course that costs around $2,000. At the end of the program there is a live event. I expect to make back my $2,000 at least 40 times next year–and for the following decade.And the financial rewards are just the beginning.What are you doing to make yourself more valuable right now? What are you doing to grow increasingly valuable in the future? You need to answer these questions as if the quality of your life and results depend upon that answer.last_img read more


first_imgCongress vice-president Rahul Gandhi on Sunday targeted Prime Minister Narendra Modi, alleging that corruption was flourishing in the States ruled by the Bharatiya Janata Party and involved party leaders, while the PM merely talked about fighting graft with slogans. On the second day of his poll campaign as part of the Congress’s Navsarjan Yatra in north Gujarat, Mr. Gandhi talked about alleged financial dealings involving BJP president Amit Shah’s son Jay Shah, and also the recent Securities Exchange Board of India (SEBI) order slapping a penalty of ₹15 lakh on Gujarat Chief Minister Vijay Rupani’s Hindu Undivided Family (HUF) for manipulative trades in a small company. Mr. Gandhi said that the share market regulator had termed Mr. Rupani beimaan (dishonest) and imposed a fine on him, yet there was no word from the Prime Minister on the issue. “Gujarat is more corrupt than the entire country,” Mr. Gandhi said. “Surat businessmen told me that policemen come to their units every two minutes [allegedly to demand bribes].” Mr. Gandhi said there were vast differences between Mr. Modi’s speeches on fighting graft, and the ground reality. “Jay Shah, son of Amit Shah, increased the turnover of his company from ₹50,000 to ₹80 crore in a few months after the BJP came to power in 2014. The people of Gujarat know this cannot be done without corruption or irregularity,” he alleged, also pointing to the PM’s silence on it. PM’s silence“Recently, SEBI said your Chief Minister is beimaan (dishonest) and they fined him for manipulative trades in stock market,” he said, adding, “Earlier, Modiji used to say na khaoonga, na khane doonga [I will neither take graft nor allow it]. Please open your [Mr. Modi’s] mouth now and say something. But he is silent.”“Now, Modi’s slogan new slogan is na bolta hu, na bolne dunga (I will not speak myself and I will not allow others to speak),” he said. “The people of the country want to listen what you [Mr. Modi] have to say on Amit Shah’s son’s company and on Vijay Rupani’s share transactions. If you don’t say anything on the issue, the people of Gujarat will believe that you are not a chowkidar (watchman) but a bhagidar (collaborator),” he said.SEBI hasreportedly fined 22 entities, including the Rupani HUF (Hindu Undivided Family), for alleged manipulative trading in the shares of a company.Mr. Gandhi asked the government to stop levying Goods and Services Tax on most items. Petrol, diesel and domestic gas cylinders should be brought within the ambit of the tax regime.last_img read more


first_imgAmid the raging controversy over Padmavati, an education officer in Madhya Pradesh’s Dewas district has issued a circular banning a song from the film from being played at cultural programmes in schools.However, the district collector on Thursday ordered the withdrawal of the circular with immediate effect and said a showcause notice has been served to the officer concerned to explain his action within three days.In the circular issued on Wednesday, Dewas district education officer (DEO) Rajiv Suryavanshi directed the principals and head masters of all government and private schools to stop using the film’s song, titled ‘Ghoomar’, during cultural programmes in their respective institutions.last_img


first_imgFormer Bihar Chief Minister and Hindustani Awam Morcha (Secular) leader Jitan Ram Manjhi on Wednesday declared that he had quit the NDA and would join the RJD-led grand alliance. Mr. Manjhi hit out at the Nitish Kumar-led NDA government in Bihar as “anti-poor”.“I’m happy to announce that our party has decided to join RJD-led grand alliance as we’re not getting due respect in NDA”, Mr. Manjhi said. .He said three things compelled him to take this step. “First, about 99% of the people who were arrested under prohibition laws come from poor families; the poor people also suffered as the government put a ban on sand mining in the State and lastly, every day there is talk of a cut in reservation percentage for Scheduled Caste people.”Mr. Manjhi expressed displeasure over the appointment of new police chief of the State, K.S. Dwivedi. “I’m saying this in a guarded way that the government has appointed a police official as Bihar’s new DGP who was responsible for Bhagalpur riot,” he said.RJD leader Tejashwi Yadav said the grand alliance had been strengthened with the coming of Mr. Manjhi.last_img read more


first_imgThe Maharashtra government is likely to move its banking services to the newly-launched India Post Payments Banks (IPPBs). The Central government has directed the State government to move the financial activities of all its marketing organisations and agricultural and fertiliser cooperatives to the 2,500 access points proposed by the Department of Posts, the nodal agency for the IPPBs.The launch of the IPPBs is likely to double the retail banking infrastructure and help Maharashtra facilitate and finance major projects better.Information technology will also reduce the State’s dependence on district and state cooperative banks. “We have recently received directives from A.N. Nanda, Secretary, Ministry of Communication, Government of India, in this regard. They (the Centre) are soon going to set up branches, while about 2,500 access points will be in Maharashtra,” said a senior State official.Maharashtra has 15,475 banking branches, including thousands of Primary Agriculture Credit Cooperative Societies controlled by the and District Central Cooperative Banks (DCCBs) and State Cooperative Banks (SCBs), which provide banking services through Bank Mitras and alternate business channels such as mobile and internet banking. The DCCB subscriber base in the State as on March 31, 2018 was 7,19,068. Earlier, for demonetisation to achieve its desired objective, a special investigation team of the Ministry of Finance had suggested better monitoring of DCCBs, which were feared to be involved in suspicious activities during the period.Prime Minister Narendra Modi had, on August 21, 2018, dedicated services of the IPPBs to the nation. The new platform will double the retail banking infrastructure in the country and provide an unprecedented impetus to digital payments, officials said. The IPPB’s access points will also help citizens make digital payments across multiple platforms. A total of 650 branches and approximately 1.55 lakh access points have been proposed by the Department of Posts across the country. Senior officials indicated that as per the State’s plans direct benefit transfers under various welfare schemes will also be moved to the IPPBs soon.last_img read more


first_imgDilip Bora could not hold back his tears when he met members the family of a colleague he lost 34 years ago, in central Assam’s Hojai on Tuesday. The occasion was National Forest Martyrs’ Day.Meeting them reminded him of a night in 1984 when a team of 10 forest guards had laid in wait for a timber smuggling gang. None, including his colleague Karuna Kakati, had any firearm or sharp weapon. “We had sticks, torches and umbrellas, but were determined to catch the timber smugglers who were using a 16 ft wide hill stream to take logs out of the Kharkhari Reserve Forest near Boko (65 km west of Guwahati),” Mr. Bora, pushing 60 and set to retire as Forest Ranger in six months, told The Hindu from Hojai.The team was high on confidence. But what it did not factor in was the number of people they were up against and the weapons they wielded. “Some of us tried to stop the logs as they floated down on rafts while some chased the men who followed the logs. Before we knew anything, there were several armed people rushing at us. We thought it best to run and live to catch them another day,” he said.Karuna Kalita and another forest guard, Boloram Das, weren’t quick enough. “I heard Karuna scream before jumping into the river and drift with the current,” Mr. Bora said. Hacked in the head and neck, Mr. Kalita died in Guwahati Medical College Hospital nine days later. Mr Das died on the way to the hospital.Martyrs for earthThe Assam Forest Department prepared a list of 68 people who died in the line of duty during the last 35 years. They include Altaf Ahmed, Biren Boro, Madhuram Basumatary, Pradip Barma and 22 others killed by extremist groups such as National Democratic Front of Boroland and United Liberation Front of Asom, mostly in the 1980s and early 1990s.The extremists had during the time made jungles their hideouts, felled trees and killed wildlife to smuggle timber and animal body parts for money to buy firearms.“Our men are unsung heroes of the earth. They work in very difficult conditions and without any complaint, mostly for the passion of protecting the biodiversity that is so essential for humanity,” N.K. Vasu, Principal Chief Conservator of Forests, said.Extremists abducted and killed some green guards such as Forest Ranger Ibrahim Ali Khan. He was waylaid in Manas National Park in June 1997, moved in captivity from one place to another only to be shot two months later.Others have been killed by the animals they protect. For instance, a rhino gored Home Guard Ranjit Medhi in Kaziranga National Park in November 2008. “These are occupational hazards,” the park’s Division Forest Officer Rohini Ballave Saikia said.last_img read more


first_imgOdisha’s Kandhamal Haldi (turmeric), famous for its healing properties, is a few steps away from receiving GI tag as the Geographical Indications Journal has advertised its application seeking objections.Kandhamal Apex Spices Association for Marketing, based at the district headquarter town of Phulbani, had moved for registration ‘Kandhamal Haldi’ which was accepted under sub-section (1) of Section 13 of the Geographical Indications of Goods (Registration and Protection) Act, 1999.Turmeric is the main cash crop of tribal people in Kandhamal. Apart from domestic use, turmeric is also used for cosmetic and medicinal purposes.last_img


first_imgStringent security arrangements have been put in place to ensure peaceful and free and fair polling in the ninth and final phase of the Jammu and Kashmir panchayat elections to be held on Tuesday, State Chief Electoral Officer Shaleen Kabra said on Monday. The voting will begin at 8 a.m. at 452 polling stations in Kashmir division, he said. Mr. Kabra said 346 polling stations have been categorised as hypersensitive in this phase. 430 in the frayAs many as 430 candidates are in the fray for 55 sarpanch and 138 panch seats while 68 sarpanchs and 433 panchs have been elected unopposed in this phase, he said. Mr. Kabra said an electorate of 68,745 will be voting for sarpanch constituencies and 20,688 for panch constituencies. “Photo voter slips have been distributed among the voters to inform them of their polling station,” he said. Nine-phase pollsThe nine-phased panchayat elections commenced on November 17, recording 74.1 percentage polling in the first phase across the State. The eighth phase was conducted on December 8 and recorded 79.3% polling. The results have been announced for all the eighth phases by the respective returning officers. The CEO said Basic Minimum Facilities have been ensured in all the polling stations across the State for the final phase. Senior government officers have been appointed as general observers to oversee the smooth, fair and orderly conduct of the elections, he said, adding expenditure observers are keeping a watch on candidates. He said control rooms have been established in all the districts to respond promptly to any complaints of violation of the model code of conduct and to disseminate information to the people. Security arrangements have been made including deployment of Central Armed Police Forces, he said. Mr. Kabra appealed to the voters to come forward and exercise their right to franchise.last_img read more


first_imgInstead of announcing farm loan waiver like other States, the Odisha Cabinet on Friday approved the Krushak Assistance for Livelihood and Income Augmentation (KALIA) scheme amounting to ₹10,000 crore to accelerate agricultural prosperity in the State and to reduce poverty.KALIA is progressive, inclusive and will make a direct attack on poverty by way of massive investment in the agriculture sector and making benefits reach the most needy through direct benefit transfer (DBT) mode, said Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik briefing presspersons after the Cabinet meeting.Interest freeMr. Patnaik said that under KALIA an amount of ₹10,180 crore will be spent over a period of three years till 2020-211. Crop loans up to ₹50,000 will henceforth be interest free, and the scheme will be reviewed in 2020-21 for further modifications.He termed the new scheme historical, stating that it covers almost 92% of the cultivators in the State and almost all landless agricultural labourers.There are about 32 lakh cultivators in the State. Of these, about 20 lakh have availed of crop loans. Of the 20 lakh loanee farmers, about 60% have regularly repaid loans. Further, the entire gamut of share croppers and landless labourers will not be covered under a loan waiver scheme, Mr. Patnaik pointed out.“What wrong have the 60% done in repaying the loans,” questioned Mr. Patnaik, while criticising the Opposition Congress and the BJP that have promised loan waiver if voted to power in the State.He added that KALIA scheme covers the cultivators, loanee, as well as non-loanee farmers, share croppers and landless agricultural labourers. It also specifically takes care of vulnerable agricultural families identified through gram panchayats and crop loans are made available at 0% interest.Financial assistanceAll the small and marginal farmers of the State (92% cultivators) will be covered under the scheme. An amount of ₹10,000 per family at the rate of ₹5,000 for Kharif and Rabi shall be provided as financial assistance for taking up cultivation.The farmers will have complete independence to take up interventions as per their needs. This component is not linked to extent of land owned and will greatly benefit share croppers and actual cultivators most of whom own very small extent of land. Under this initiative, 10 lakh landless households will be supported with a unit cost of ₹12,500 to take up activities like small goat rearing units, mini layer units, duck units, fishery kits for fishermen and women, mushroom cultivation and bee keeping.As regards financial assistance to vulnerable agriculture households and landless labourers, an annual financial assistance of ₹10,000 per household will be provided to take care of their sustenance. Deserving families will be identified and selected by gram panchayats. About 10 lakh households will be covered over two years.Further, life insurance cover of ₹2 lakh and additional personal accident cover of ₹2 lakh will be provided to both cultivators and agricultural labourers covering about 57 lakh households.last_img read more


first_imgChief Minister Naveen Patnaik launched the Krushak Assistance for Livelihood and Income Augmentation (KALIA) scheme to accelerate agricultural prosperity and to reduce poverty in Odisha on the New Year Eve on Monday. The scheme,announced on December 21, will cover 92% of the cultivators, loanee and non-loanee farmers, sharecroppers and landless agricultural labourers.Mr. Patnaik released the logo and website of the scheme, a list of 21.40 lakh small farmers and a draft farmers’ benefit list of one lakh actual farmers. He urged the Departments of Agriculture, Cooperation and Panchayati Raj to work in mission mode to ensure that not a single farmer was left out in the scheme. To begin with, the farmers will be provided ₹5,000 each to take care of the initial investment for the current Rabi season. In a full year, all the small and marginal farmers will receive ₹10,000 for Kharif and Rabi combined. The final list of all beneficiaries will be prepared in the next phase from the gram panchayat level.The farmers can know about details of the KALIA scheme during the People’s Empowerment – Enabling Transparency and Accountability (PEETHA) camps being organised between January 15 and January 20 at gram panchayat level. The PEETHA camp also will be organised from February 15 to 20 and from March 15 to 20, 2019. The letters about extension of financial assistance to eligible small and marginal farmers will also be handed over during the PEETHA camp.The State level committee, Implementation committee, District level committee and Block level committee have been formed for monitoring and overseeing smooth implementation of the scheme.As regards landless agricultural households, financial assistance of ₹12,500 will be provided to each for agricultural allied activities such as small goat rearing unit, mini-layer unit, duckery units, fishery kits for fisherman, mushroom cultivation and bee-keeping etc.Besides, the vulnerable cultivators/landless agricultural labourers will get financial assistance of ₹10,000 per family per year to enable them to take care of their sustenance.An amount of ₹10,180 crore will be spent under KALIA over a period of three years till 2020-211. Crop loans up to ₹50,000 will henceforth be interest free.Night meal Meanwhile, Mr. Patnaik inaugurated the night meal facility at as many as 54 Aahar centres located near government hospitals across the State. Aahar centres are being run in 76 municipal areas of the State providing noon meal comprising cooked rice and dalma at places of public congregations at ₹5.last_img read more


first_imgA new initiative launched by the Congress government in Rajasthan for identifying and resolving issues in upper primary schools situated in the rural areas through “Bal Sabha” (Children’s Assembly) is set to bring about qualitative changes in education. Besides students, the Sabhas will be attended by parents, teachers and village elders.A series of Bal Sabhas was organised in as many as 3,300 schools in Jaipur district on Saturday last. Minister of State for Education Govind Singh Dotasra attended the congregation in Bhojlawa village of the Govindgarh panchayat samiti.Active roleThe schoolchildren, who presented songs and delivered short speeches in Hindi and English, also spoke about the problems faced by them in school. Students Seema Sharma and Pooja, who led the proceedings, said they would like the village elders to play an active role in the school’s affairs and guide them in their career choices.Govindgarh panchayat samiti pradhan Lal Chand Sherawat said the Bal Sabha would be organised on each Saturday at a public place. Mr. Dotasra said that the novel concept would ensure the participation of all stakeholders and significantly improve the quality of education in government schools. Principal Secretary (School Education) Bhaskar A. Sawant said extracurricular activities would shape the personality of students, while Director (School Education) Pradeep Kumar Borad said the Bal Sabhas would promote dialogue between villagers and schoolchildren.last_img read more


first_imgHaryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar on Tuesday said the government has decided to discourage paddy crop sowing as the State was staring at a water crisis due to depleting groundwater level.He said a pilot project will be launched in seven blocks of Yamunanagar, Ambala, Karnal, Kurukshetra, Kaithal, Jind and Sonipat districts, where sowing of maize and ‘tur’ pulses would be promoted by giving incentives to farmers.“The scheme has been formulated keeping in mind the interest of farmers and water conservation. By diversifying the area of non-basmati paddy into maize under this scheme, the total saving of water is expected to be 0.71 crore cm (1 cm = 1 lakh litres of water),” he said, adding that water depletion has led to 60 dark zones in the State, including 21 critical ones in 10 districts.Saves water, powerMr. Khattar said crop diversification is need of the day for the State as it saves water, electricity and improves soil health. “During the 1970s, maize and pulses were major crops in Haryana, but they have been replaced by water-guzzling crops such as paddy and wheat. To revive the old maize or pulses area, immediate crop diversification of paddy by maize and pulses is our priority,” he said.“Under the new scheme, the identified farmers will be provided seeds free of cost. Apart from this, a financial assistance of ₹2,000 per acre will be provided in two parts. The maize crop insurance premium of ₹766 per hectare will also be borne by the government under the Pradhan Mantri Fasal Bima Yojana. Also, the maize produce will be procured by government agencies such as HAFED, Food, and Supply Department at Minimum Support Price. Likewise, ‘tur’ seeds will also be provided free of cost to the farmers along with financial incentive,” he said.The Chief Minister also attacked the Delhi government, saying that arrears of ₹100 crore were outstanding against it for the supply of surplus water through the Yamuna river.last_img read more


first_imgNearly half of mammal species surveyed in a new study practice infanticide. Of the 260 species studied, 119 kill their own young, researchers report online today in Science. Infanticide was most likely to occur in species in which the female was capable of breeding at any point in the year. The findings suggest that a male kills unrelated offspring in order to shorten a female’s postpartum infertility phase, so he can mate with her sooner—a hypothesis confirmed by the observation that males will often mate with the mothers of children they’ve killed. (Human hunting may also play a role, as appears to be the case in bears.) However, females can use sexual promiscuity to create confusion about the paternity of offspring and discourage infanticide. Oddly enough, scientists believe this leads to larger testicles in males: When females are promiscuous, sperm competition increases, and evolution selects for males with the largest testicles capable of producing the most sperm. Sure enough, the team found larger testes in species that have been practicing infanticide for longer. That may explain the absurd size of the gonads of the male mouse lemur, seen above.last_img read more


first_imgTOKYO—The winners of this year’s Japan Prizes are grateful for the awards, but also hope the recognition will further their scientific objectives in improving treatments for genetic disorders and reducing the toll from flood disasters.  Theodore Friedmann of the University of California, San Diego, and Alain Fischer of the Imagine Institute in Paris and of the Collège de France will share the prize for “Medical Science and Medicinal Science.” Their winning work involved gene therapy, an experimental technique in which genes are inserted into patients to replace mutated genes that are causing disease. Friedmann is credited with originating the concept in the 1970s and furthering basic research. Fischer, in 2000, reported demonstrating the clinical efficacy of gene therapy for the first time, using blood stem cells to treat a fatal genetic disorder called X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency. “Gene therapy has become a reality in recent years with many cases of successful treatments; the field is flourishing,” said Hiroshi Komiyama, a chemical engineer and former president of the University of Tokyo who chaired the selection committee.Yutaka Takahasi, a professor emeritus of civil engineering at the University of Tokyo, convinced engineers and policymakers to look holistically at entire river basins and the hydrological cycle when attempting to control flooding, rather than simply building more dams and higher embankments, Komiyama explained. Takahasi is being recognized in the field of “Resources, Energy and Social Infrastructure.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)All three winners, appearing here today, thanked Japan Prize officials and the selection committees. But they all also expressed hope that the awards will highlight ongoing challenges in their respective fields. For gene therapy, “the path from concept to reality has not been straightforward and easy,” Friedmann said.The setbacks have included poor results from initial trials in the 1990s. And in 1999, a patient enrolled in a gene therapy trial in the United States died. It took several years for researchers in the field to address resulting safety and ethical questions. Fischer also suspended his gene therapy trials to solve safety issues. Research picked up again in the later 2000s, particularly with the use of new techniques for safely introducing the genes into the human body.At today’s press conference, both Friedmann and Fischer expressed confidence that their approach is on the cusp of mainstream clinical use. Recent advances “give us reasonable hope that gene therapy will enter the armamentarium” to treat genetic blood disorders, some cancers, and inherited diseases, Fischer said, adding: “We might be very close to approval by regulatory authorities.” He cautioned that the field still needs to prove itself. “The number of patients treated is limited and the follow-up short,” he said. Friedmann said he hopes the Japan Prize will “lead to greater awareness of the field.”As for his specialty, Takahasi said that although many lessons have been learned in watershed management, new challenges are emerging as global warming leads to changing rainfall patterns, more powerful typhoons, and other weather anomalies. He said he hopes Japan Prize recognition will get Japan and the world “to recognize the serious threat and come to grips with the new challenges.”The laureates will return to Tokyo in April for the ceremony. at which they will receive a certificate of recognition and a commemorative gold medal. Each prize category carries a cash award of approximately $420,000.Japan Prize topics are selected annually from within a range of disciplines gathered under two broad areas: physics, chemistry, and engineering; and life science, agriculture, and medicine. The categories for the 2016 prizes are “Materials and Production” and “Biological Production and Biological Environment.” The prize is intended to recognize individuals for scientific achievements that also promote peace and prosperity.last_img read more


first_imgAMSTERDAM—Insecure about your height? You may want to avoid this tiny country by the North Sea, whose population has gained an impressive 20 centimeters in the past 150 years and is now officially the tallest on the planet. Scientists chalk up most of that increase to rising wealth, a rich diet, and good health care, but a new study suggests something else is going on as well: The Dutch growth spurt may be an example of human evolution in action.The study, published online today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, shows that tall Dutch men on average have more children than their shorter counterparts, and that more of their children survive. That suggests genes that help make people tall are becoming more frequent among the Dutch, says behavioral biologist and lead author Gert Stulp of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.”This study drives home the message that the human population is still subject to natural selection,” says Stephen Stearns, an evolutionary biologist at Yale University who wasn’t involved in the study. “It strikes at the core of our understanding of human nature, and how malleable it is.” It also confirms what Stearns knows from personal experience about the population in the northern Netherlands, where the study took place: “Boy, they are tall.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)For many years, the U.S. population was the tallest in the world. In the 18th century, American men were 5 to 8 centimeters taller than those in the Netherlands. Today, Americans are the fattest, but they lost the race for height to northern Europeans—including Danes, Norwegians, Swedes, and Estonians—sometime in the 20th century.Just how these peoples became so tall isn’t clear, however. Genetics has an important effect on body height: Scientists have found at least 180 genes that influence how tall you become. Each one has only a small effect, but together, they may explain up to 80% of the variation in height within a population. Yet environmental factors play a huge role as well. The children of Japanese immigrants to Hawaii, for instance, grew much taller than their parents. Scientists assume that a diet rich in milk and meat played a major role.The Dutch have become so much taller in such a short period that scientists chalk most of it up to their changing environment. As the Netherlands developed, it became one of the world’s largest producers and consumers of cheese and milk. An increasingly egalitarian distribution of wealth and universal access to health care may also have helped.Still, scientists wonder whether natural selection has played a role as well. For men, being tall is associated with better health, attractiveness to the opposite sex, a better education, and higher income—all of which could lead to more reproductive success, Stulp says.Yet studies in the United States don’t show this. Stulp’s own research among Wisconsinites born between 1937 and 1940, for instance, showed that average-sized men had more children than shorter and taller men, and shorter women had more children than those of average height. Taken together, Stulp says, this suggests natural selection in the United States pulls in the opposite direction of environmental factors like diet, making people shorter instead of taller. That may explain why the growth in average American height has leveled off.Stulp—who says his towering 2-meter frame did not influence his research interest—wondered if the same was true in his native country. To find out, he and his colleagues turned to a database tracking key life data for almost 100,000 people in the country’s three northern provinces. The researchers included only people over 45 who were born in the Netherlands to Dutch-born parents. This way, they had a relatively accurate number of total children per subject (most people stop having children after 45) and they also avoided the effects of immigration.In the remaining sample of 42,616 people, taller men had more children on average, despite the fact that they had their first child at a higher age. The effect was small—an extra 0.24 children at most for taller men—but highly significant. (Taller men also had a smaller chance of remaining childless, and a higher chance of having a partner.)  The same effect wasn’t seen in women, who had the highest reproductive success when they were of average height.  The study suggests this may be because taller women had a smaller chance of finding a mate, while shorter women were at higher risk of losing a child.Because tall men are likely to pass on the genes that made them tall, the outcome suggests that—in contrast to Americans—the Dutch population is evolving to become taller, Stulp says. “This is not what we’ve seen in other studies—that’s what makes it exciting,” says evolutionary biologist Simon Verhulst of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, who was Stulp’s Ph.D. adviser but wasn’t involved in the current study. Verhulst points out that the team can’t be certain that genes involved in height are actually becoming more frequent, however, as the authors acknowledge.The study suggests that sexual selection is at work in the Dutch population, Stearns says: Dutch women may prefer taller men because they expect them to have more resources to invest in their children. But there are also other possibilities. It could be that taller men are more resistant to disease, Stearns says, or that they are more likely to divorce and start a second family. “It will be a difficult question to answer.”Another question is why tall men in Holland are at a reproductive advantage but those in the United States are not. Stulp says he can only speculate. One reason may be that humans often choose a partner who’s not much shorter or taller than they are themselves. Because shorter women in the United States have more children, tall men may do worse than those of average height because they’re less likely to partner with a short woman.In the end, Stearns says, the advantage of tall Dutchmen may be only temporary. Often in evolution, natural selection will favor one trend for a number of generations, followed by a stabilization or even a return to the opposite trend. In the United States, selection for height appears to have occurred several centuries ago, leading to taller men, and then it stopped. “Perhaps the Dutch caught up and actually overshot the American men,” he says.last_img read more


first_imgDivisions over whether to provide a conduit to citizenship for young “Dreamer” immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally loomed as the pivotal sticking point Wednesday as House Republicans searched for a solution to their campaign-season standoff over an issue that has split them for years.In bargaining Wednesday, moderates told conservatives that any deal would have to include steps that could ultimately lead to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of Dreamers. The issue was left unresolved, according to two Republicans who spoke on condition of anonymity to describe private talks.Read it at Hastings Tribune Related Itemslast_img


first_imgDr. Bharat Patel, 71, of Milford, Connecticut, pleaded guilty at the New Haven federal court June 25, to narcotics distribution and health care fraud offenses.In pleading guilty, Patel admitted that he wrote hundreds of medically unnecessary prescriptions for oxycodone and hydrocodone, and received $158,523.95 as a result of this and related criminal conduct, a press release from the U.S. Attorney for the District of Connecticut, said.Read it at News India Times Related Itemslast_img