first_imgA new initiative launched by the Congress government in Rajasthan for identifying and resolving issues in upper primary schools situated in the rural areas through “Bal Sabha” (Children’s Assembly) is set to bring about qualitative changes in education. Besides students, the Sabhas will be attended by parents, teachers and village elders.A series of Bal Sabhas was organised in as many as 3,300 schools in Jaipur district on Saturday last. Minister of State for Education Govind Singh Dotasra attended the congregation in Bhojlawa village of the Govindgarh panchayat samiti.Active roleThe schoolchildren, who presented songs and delivered short speeches in Hindi and English, also spoke about the problems faced by them in school. Students Seema Sharma and Pooja, who led the proceedings, said they would like the village elders to play an active role in the school’s affairs and guide them in their career choices.Govindgarh panchayat samiti pradhan Lal Chand Sherawat said the Bal Sabha would be organised on each Saturday at a public place. Mr. Dotasra said that the novel concept would ensure the participation of all stakeholders and significantly improve the quality of education in government schools. Principal Secretary (School Education) Bhaskar A. Sawant said extracurricular activities would shape the personality of students, while Director (School Education) Pradeep Kumar Borad said the Bal Sabhas would promote dialogue between villagers and schoolchildren.last_img read more


first_imgPhoto: Primary school aged children enjoy a game of silent touch football as part of the Silent Sport Challenge. (ABC News: Mark Moore) Touch Football Australia CEO Colm Maguire said one in six Australians dealt with a hearing impairment.”It is unusual because of that lack of communication that is verbal, more looking at each other, having to utilise different ways of communicating,” he said about the game.Mr Maguire said there was no barrier to participation whether players were hearing impaired or not. By Adrienne Francis (Courtesy of ABC)Photo: Chloe Nash says the only thing that you are doing differently is communicating differently. (ABC News: Adrienne Francis) Check out the TFA video below, demonstrating there are no barriers to participate in Touch Football. Related Links2016 Silent Sports Challenge A unique game of touch football is closing the divide between the hearing and silent worlds. The Silent Sport Challenge began in 2011 and gives those with hearing the chance to experience what it is like to play the game without sound.Players wear ear plugs and instead of communicating with whistles and referees use flags to signal players.Twenty-nine-year-old Canberra woman Chloe Nash, who was born with profound deafness, has been playing touch since she was nine.”The only thing that you are doing differently is communicating differently and that you just need to break through other peoples prejudices, other peoples barriers that they are creating for you,” Ms Nash said.Ms Nash wants hearing health and wellbeing listed as one of the 10 national health priorities to attract and allocate funding to improve access to childhood Auslan education, increase availability of interpreters, improve captioning services and target specialised mental health and aged care.”It is not just Canberra, although we are in dire need. It is all over Australia,” she said.”Deaf people suffer from isolation and that impacts on their mental health.”Long-term exposure to excessive noise means the number of Australians who are deaf, hearing impaired or hard of hearing is continuing to increase.Game raises awareness of disability that affects millionslast_img read more