first_imgTransfers Wenger calculates Alexis Sanchez could cost Arsenal £140 million Last updated 2 years ago 00:59 7/9/2017 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(1) Alexis Sanchez Arsene Wenger Arsenal Getty Images Transfers Arsenal Manchester City Premier League A. Sánchez The striker may leave the Gunners on free transfer and his manager admits the club may lose out on a transfer fee and have to spend to replace him Arsene Wenger concedes the decision to keep Alexis Sanchez could cost Arsenal upwards of £140 million.The Chile international is in the final year of his contract with Arsenal and was rumoured to be angling for a move to Manchester City for much of the summer.Alexis 25/1 to be PL top scorer Editors’ Picks ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing After a possible deal between the two clubs fell apart at the transfer deadline, Sanchez was reportedly furious over the move and his future with the Gunners beyond this year is in doubt.The gamble that Wenger has taken in keeping Sanchez and potentially losing him for nothing is not lost on the manager, as he admitted to beIN sports the decision could cost Arsenal a huge transfer sum — the money he would have brought in and the fee for finding a replacement.”You take a Sanchez into the final year of his contract, you sacrifice £60-£70m income and at the end of the season you will have to buy somebody for that amount of money,” Wenger told beIN Sports.”It has a huge price so at some stage you have to make a decision, you have to sacrifice one or two.”Exclusive: #Wenger says it will cost £70m to replace #Sanchez at #Arsenal next season.#PL #AFC pic.twitter.com/60fu5QRnWB— beIN SPORTS (@beINSPORTS) September 6, 2017Wenger attributes the situation to a pair of factors — the natural rise in wages but also a transfer market that has seen fees skyrocket over the past few seasons.However, the manager sees the situation as difficult to overcome, as it means inflated prices for players who are not difference makers.”We have today 107 players in England who go into the final year of their contract,” Wenger said.”It’s a complete rotation and change in the way people see their career for two reasons.”One, all the players expect higher wages because they anticipate inflation.”All the clubs, because the transfer market has gone up so much, the clubs do not want to pay so high prices for all the transfers for players who are good players, but will not change their life.”Specifically, Wenger singled out Ousmane Dembele’s transfer from Borussia Dortmund to Barcelona as an example of how the market drastically changed quickly without much actual change in a player’s ability or development.Wenger on Dembele quote gfx“The amount of money is completely disconnected to reality and the truth,” Wenger said.”One example — no matter how well you work as a football coach, Dembele last year was €15m, this year €150m.”No matter how well you work on the football pitch, you cannot make a player go from €15m to €150m.”The calculation between investment and what you can get back, that has gone. It’s just, ‘can you afford to buy or not?'”last_img read more


first_imgJuventus boss Massimiliano Allegri will field a star-studded team in hopes of topping Group H.Juventus will play Young Boys on Wednesday and hope to clinch the top spot of their group. Asked if Cristiano Ronaldo would have been rested if the top spot was already secured, Allegri told reporters: “For sure, just like many others,” as quoted by Goal.“Chiellini definitely does not play due to the synthetic pitch. Alex Sandro is almost back, but to immediately put him on the synthetic pitch seemed risky. He will be ready for Saturday.“Chiellini I will leave to rest because on the plastic he can have problems. I also told him not to walk too much. In any case, there will be no excuses and a victory must be brought home.Franck Ribery, FiorentinaFiorentina owner: “Ribery played better than Ronaldo!” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Fiorentina owner Rocco Commisso was left gushing over Franck Ribery’s performance against Juventus, which he rates above that of even Cristiano Ronaldo’s.“Juve is among the big clubs and avoiding the other first-place sides is very important. There are teams like Real, Barcelona, ​​City and maybe Paris Saint-Germain. Also, I hope all the Italian teams pass to the next stage.“Finishing top does not mean that we will face an easy team in the last 16, but certainly softer.”Allegri previously said that a victory against Young Boys is the most important thing for the club right now.last_img read more


first_imgNPRTo get ready for SXSW 2018, we listened to more than 1,800 artists.In the middle of every March, the SXSW Music Festival fills Austin, Texas, with thousands of musicians from around the world. It’s a marathon so daunting — it’s a marathon and a sprint, really — that even longtime SXSW veterans need a hand winnowing the festival’s countless discoveries down to digestible doses.That’s where The Austin 100 comes in. Handpicked from thousands of bands playing at this year’s festival, these 100 songs highlight the best SXSW 2018 has to offer — songs from around the world, across a broad spectrum of genres, sounds and styles.Here’s how you can listen: Every artist page includes a streamable and downloadable version of a song we love. You can also download a ZIP file containing all 100 songs here or from any artist page. Or if you’re a Spotify user, you can stream most of the mix using our Austin 100 playlist.These six-plus hours of music are only the beginning of NPR Music’s SXSW 2018 coverage: You will eventually find more recommendations, conversations, videos and dispatches from this year’s festival at NPR.org/SXSW. But in the meantime, enjoy the music!Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more


first_imgThe 6th Golden Kela Award held on 29 March, awarded all the worst bollywood performance of 2013 based upon votes. Abhishek Sharma, director of Tere Bin Laden Part 2 who was present there to recieve his last year’s Golden Kela presented the most prestigous award of the evening, the Baawra Ho Gaya Ke award to the perfectionist Aamir Khan for Dhoom 3 for portraying larger than life stunts in the movie.Sajid Khan’s Himmatwala won the Golden Kela for the worst movie award. Ajay Devgan and Sonakshi Sinha managed to take home the Kelas for second time in a row for being the worst actor(male and female) for their acting skills shown in Himmatwala and R..Rajkumar respectively. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ Sanjay Leela Bhansali was titled with worst director award for his superhit movie, Goliyon ki Rasleela…Ram Leela. The honour for the worst actor in supporting role (male) went to Aditya Roy Kapoor for Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani and in the female category it was Deepika, Jacqueline and Amisha (Race 2) bagging the honours for their histrionics. Contributing to the most atrocious lyrics, Sameer for Raghupati Raghav from Krrish 3 earned the Golden Kela where the most irritating song title was given to Party All Night from Boss. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixA number of special awards were also presented like the Dara Singh Award for the Worst Accent  which was won by Deepika Padukone for Chennai Express, Aakhir Kyun Award to  Priyanka Chopra for trying to look cool in her music video Exotic, Rajshri Award for Most Regressive Film of the Year  went to Ranjhanaa, Why Are You Still Trying Award to Shahid Kapoor for R…Rajkumar, and Aap Yahaan Aaye Kisliye Award to Uday Chopra with a special tribute to his career that never started.Apart from this, some of the last years’ movie also managed to bag home the Anti Kela Awards like Saheb Biwi aur Gangster 2, Go Goa Gone, The Lunchbox and Shahid for actually making sense and giving the movies audience some respite.last_img read more


first_img 3 min read May 5, 2015 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global As the fields of robotics, machine learning and artificial intelligence become more sophisticated, the separation between ‘human’ jobs and ‘robotic’ ones continues to disintegrate.Tasks previously reserved for humans are being automated, a trend that is gaining steam. A 2013 report by Oxford researchers projected that by 2033, 47 percent of jobs in the U.S. could be performed by machines.So is your job safe?If you work in a creative field, the answer is probably yes. That’s according to a new report, called Creativity vs. Robots, co-written by Oxford researchers and Nesta, a London-based non-profit research and innovation group. By evaluating 702 professions in the U.S. for their required degree of creativity, the report estimates the likelihood that each position will be overtaken by robots in the near future.In a reversal of current economic realities, fine artists – actors, painters, dancers and musicians – can breathe the easiest. Along with other creative types, a group that includes graphic designers, architects, marketing directors, advertising managers, civil engineers and computer game programmers, their jobs, which the study identified as “highly creative,” will be among the last to be replaced machines.Related: This Is What Robots Will Be Doing in 2025Interestingly, when it comes to monetary gain, the study found an inverse U-shape relationship between the probability that an occupation is highly creative and the average income it delivers. Unsurprisingly, fine artists (your actors, painters, dancers and the like) reside on one side of the curve, making very little, on average, a year, while creative professions associated with the arrival of new technologies  bring in high annual salaries.Other professions the report predicts will continue to be executed by flesh and blood humans well into the future include:Translators and interpretors (5.8 percent risk of compurization within the next 10 to 20 years)Performing artists (7 percent)Architects (7.1 percent)Film and TV producers (8 percent)R&D on natural sciences (10.9 percent)Manufacture of watches and clocks (5.5 percent)General secondary education (9.6 percent)Unfortunately, most of the current jobs in the U.S. aren’t so safe; only 21 percent U.S. employment is classified as “highly creative,” which leaves a large swath of the working population vulnerable to replacement by robot.Many at risk positions are predicable – such as office administrators, call-center operators, loggers and super market cashiers — but the category also includes jobs that, on the surface at least, appear reasonably safe.Related: In Japan, a ‘Strange Hotel’ Will Be Staffed Almost Entirely By RobotsWith a 67.5 percent risk of computerization, it’s likely that bartending will soon be a profession of the past. On one hand, this makes sense: Multiple companies are betting big on the imminent popularity of cocktail robots (we’ve written about Somabar, a cocktail maker for the home, and similar, more upscale devices are being installed in restaurants across the country). But on the other hand, the estimation feels off: Going to a bar is a primarily social experience – is the appeal as great if you replace a chatty bartender with a machine?Apparently so. Here’s a list of other, potentially surprising occupations that are in danger of automation. (Advances in mobile robotics, data mining and computational statistics mean that “jobs that are considered creative today may not be so tomorrow,” the report warns.)Publication of directs and mailing lists (69.4 percent)News agency activities (64.5 percent)Risk and damage evaluation (58.6 percent)Event catering activities (52.7 percent)Sale of motor vehicles (45.7 percent) Register Now » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more


first_imgMay 24, 2017 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. What is the responsibility of a platform such as Facebook to its users?This week, The Guardian published its investigation into the social giant’s content moderation practices, revealing through leaked documents the capricious nature of the task at hand.The documents painted the company’s content moderation as something of a moving target, in which a split-second judgement is often required to decide whether something that is potentially offensive, graphic and even dangerous should stay on the site for purposes of awareness and education or removed entirely. Another cause for concern was how far the line went when it came to what threats that were posted could be considered credible.Related: Facebook’s Content Moderation Rules Are Both Careful and ShockingIt’s a complicated process, but when the engine of Facebook is the personal information that people share with it, it begs the question of what kind of transparency is owed to its users, especially around issues of safety and wellbeing.Monika Bickert, Facebook’s head of global policy management, wrote an editorial for The Guardian in an effort to address those concerns and lay out context when it comes to the changing standards required to make those quick decisions.With regard to that transparency, Bickert noted that while Community Standards are available to all, “we don’t always share the details of our policies, because we don’t want to encourage people to find workarounds.” But the boundaries around what is and isn’t appropriate remain blurry.Related: Why Mark Zuckerberg Runs 10,000 Facebook Versions a Day“These tensions — between raising awareness of violence and promoting it, between freedom of expression and freedom from fear, between bearing witness to something and gawking at it — are complicated, philosophical questions,” Bickert wrote. “Many organisations grapple with them, and there are rarely universal legal standards to provide clarity. Being as objective as we can is the only way we can be consistent across the world and in different contexts. But we still sometimes end up making the wrong call. … We get things wrong, and we’re constantly working to make sure that happens less often. We put a lot of detailed thought into trying to find right answers, even when there aren’t any.”So what can any organization learn from Facebook’s stance?While it’s understandable that you would want to keep proprietary practices under wraps, if a process is constantly evolving, take it upon yourself to keep your users or customers in the loop. Their insights could help refine a messy process or highlight issues that you may not see clearly from the inside. It’s also important to remember that admitting you’re wrong isn’t a death knell — it can put you in a improved position to do better going forward.center_img 3 min read Register Now »last_img read more