first_imgBournemouth boss Howe admits injury crisis likely to lead to new signingsby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBournemouth boss Eddie Howe admits he could be forced into the January market for a new defensive signing.Bournemouth may need to make transfer window moves if Nathan Ake’s injury is a problem.The Dutch defender suffered a hamstring issue at Old Trafford and was withdrawn during the 4-1 defeat.Out of form Bournemouth are already without Simon Francis, Lewis Cook, Dan Gosling and Adam Smith due to knee problems.“I need to speak to Nathan and the medical team but it looked like a hamstring concern,” said Howe. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img


first_imgzoom Sweden-based shipowner Furetank Rederi AB and its compatriot Rederi AB Älvtank have contracted two additional product/chemical tankers with LNG propulsion at China’s Avic Dingheng Shipyard.The vessels, of which Furetank and Älvtank will own one each, will be delivered during 2018 and 2019.Featuring a dual fuel/LNG propulsion, the vessels will be built to a design developed by FKAB together with Furetank with special focus on minimal impact on the environment, with close to 50% reduction of CO2 emissions, according to Gothia Tanker Alliance.Additionally, the tankers will fulfill the Tier III rules and have LNG for Inert gas production, power production with floating frequency, battery backup (UPS) for all vital functions to minimize use of auxiliary engines, installed ballast water cleaning system, ice class 1A and Alternative Propulsion System.As part of the Gothia Tanker Alliance, the companies, along with their partner Thun Tankers BV, already have four LNG-fuelled tankers under construction at the same yard. The previous vessels were ordered by the alliance in 2015.From the six tanker vessels on order, three will be owned by Furetank, two by Älvtank, while Thun Tankers is the owner of the remaining vessel.The vessels will be commercially managed by Furetank Chartering in the Gothia Tanker Alliance.last_img read more


first_imgPatna: At a time when the trades of chaiwallas and chowkidars have become part of the political discourse, a humble street hawker in Patna is diligently working to raise awareness about voting and asking the electorate to vote on the basis of a candidate’s merit to build a strong democracy.Through his ‘Cycle Jagrukta Yatra’, Lal Mani Das travels across the Bihar capital and also tells people to not give in to temptation of money or other material gains offered by others to sway their votes. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Das, 50, is a ‘bhunjawallah’ — street snack seller — and puts up his cart near the Bazaar Samiti, city’s huge vegetable and fruits market, but now only hawks the famous snack in the evening, spending early part of the day on his campaign. Wearing a shirt and a trouser, a pair of slippers, and sporting a cap bearing the Election Commission logo and a slogan, he paddles around in Patna on his bicycle, and distributes pamphlets to people, carrying an appeal to vote wisely. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KIn front of his bicycle, he has put up a banner that enumerates the qualities a candidate should have, which every voter should keep in mind. Das, himself wears a big, two-sided banner carrying a message — ‘Respect rights of a citizen. Cast your vote’ — over his shirt to spread the message. “Voting is very essential part of ensuring a strong democracy. My first target is to reach out to as many people so that more and more numbers come out and vote on the polling day. Also, I am appealing to them to vote for candidates who have character and those who respect the rule of law,” Das told PTI. On the banner mounted in front of his bicycle, a slogan on the top reads in Hindi — ‘Will respect rights of a citizen, will vote’. “In this banner I have mentioned 10 points for voters to keep in mind, whether first-timers or old-aged ones. So, first one says, we will elect those people who spend less money during election. And, those who respect the rule of law. “Also, among those seeking re-election, we should vote for a candidate, who does not create ruckus in Parliament, has an attendance of at least 75 per cent, participates in House debates and who is committed,” he said. Voters should prefer NOTA (none of the above) option if they have to choose among those candidates who often break laws, Das said. A father of four — one daughter and three sons, Das who originally hails from neighbouring Begusarai district, says, he moved to Patna 15 years ago, in search of livelihood, and lives with his wife and children in a small house near Bazaar Samiti. Asked, how much he earns from selling ‘bhunja’, he said, “I make around Rs 500 to Rs 600 on an average. But, as I am giving more time to my campaign, I am making some losses, but I have no regret.” Das admits that his wife, a homemaker, was against this idea of awareness drive, and still wants him to quit and go back to regular selling job. “She is upset, and my children also are also half-supportive of this campaign, but, I feel that as a citizen, we must each do something towards strengthening our democracy. This is my humble contribution to that larger vision of building a great nation,” he said. Das, in a profound message printed on the pamphlet he hands out, quotes writers, poets and revolutionaries to inspire people to vote with discretion. “…It is not as to who will solve the problem in the system, it is about who will take the first step towards it,” he said, quoting the lines in Hindi from the pamphlet. “If we have to save democracy, we will have to elect candidates with character, otherwise sacrifices made by the freedom fighters will go waste,” he said. The 2019 Lok Sabha polls will be held in a seven phases from April 11 to May 19. In Bihar too, which has 40 Lok Sabha seats, the elections would be held in seven phases. As part of the first phase, four constituencies in the state — Gaya, Nawada, Aurangabad and Jamui will go to polls on April 11.last_img read more


first_imgLondon: Facebook has chosen London as the centre for the global roll-out of WhatsApp pay, before the social media giant launches its digital payments service on the mobile messaging platform in India, according to a media report. WhatsApp, which has1.5 billion users globally, would hire nearly 100 people in London to focus on the digital payments service and additional operations staff would be hired in Dublin, the Financial Times reported. Facebook said it chose the UK, where WhatsApp is far more popular than the US, because it attracts a multicultural workforce from many of the countries where WhatsApp is widely used, such as India, the report said. Out of WhatsApp user base of 1.5 billion people, more than 200 million people are in India — the single largest market for the popular American messaging platform. “WhatsApp is a truly global service and these teams will help us provide WhatsApp payments and other great features for our users everywhere,” Matthew Idema, WhatsApp’s Chief Operating Officer, was quoted as saying. WhatsApp has nearly 400 employees globally. While its most popular markets are India, Brazil, Indonesia and Mexico, it has not established a local office anywhere until late last year, when it hired an India head in time for the country’s elections. Last month, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced that the company is actively working on to launch WhatsApp Pay in India. “We have a test that is running in India for WhatsApp now, we’re hoping to launch in several other countries at some point, but I don’t want to put a timeframe on that here, but it’s something that we’re actively working on,” he said during an earnings call with analysts. Almost one million people tested WhatsApp Pay in India to send money to each other in a simple and secure way. In April, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) came out with a circular regarding data localisation policy for payment system providers. Generally, data localisation refers to storing data within India. The company on May 3 told the Supreme Court that it would comply with the Reserve Bank of India’s data localisation norms before launching the full payments service in the country.last_img read more


first_imgRabat – The Moroccan government has ratified a law allowing the building of two hospitals funded by the United Arab Emirates in Casablanca and Rabat.The Moroccan government has approved a law pertaining to two projects funded by UAE to build the Shaikh Zayed Hospital in Rabat and the Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan Hospital in Casablanca.Mustafa Al Khalfi, Minister of Communications and spokesperson for the Moroccan government, said during a governmental meeting: “the two projects are aimed at enhancing the healthcare services and medical education in Morocco, as well as providing free treatment to the poor.” Mustapha Al Khalfi added that the two projects aim at the development of higher education and scientific research in the field of health sciences. The two hospitals will establish higher education institutions and vocational training centers in order to encourage researches in the medical sphere.According to the Emirate News Agency, UAE President Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan has offered “a grant of $100 million (MAD 367 million) in order to build the Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Hospital in Casablanca.”last_img read more


If you want to talk about the really good guy who’s not in the tournamentMarkelle FultzFreshman PG, 6-foot-4, WashingtonFultz’s Huskies won’t be in the tournament, but he may come up in draft conversations just the same. Like Ball, Fultz is a stand-out point guard prospect. But while Ball’s offense comes from all over, Fultz was at his best in pick-and-roll, where he has scored 101 points per 100 plays — among the best in the nation for that play type, according to Synergy. He’s especially good at turning the corner quickly and finishing at the rim, but he can also curl around the screen and fire a pull-up three — a shot that’s growing in popularity (and effectiveness) in the NBA. Otherwise, Fultz gets most of his offense by getting out in transition and getting set up for spot-up jumpers, where he’s good but doesn’t stand out as much as he does in the pick-and-roll.If you’re looking for wingsJosh JacksonFreshman SF, 6-foot-8, KansasJackson is a defensive standout and one of the best point-forward prospects in the class. While his defensive numbers (via Synergy) are good but not great (he’s holding his marks to 81 points per 100 plays overall), he can straight-up stick his man and chase him off of shots he’d otherwise take. In fact, his overall numbers are pulled down a bit by his role: Despite spending most of his time as a stretch-4, almost 60 percent of his defensive plays come against spot-up shooters and in isolation, which are play types where the offense believes it has an advantage. Yet Jackson is still holding his own.Jackson is a natural and willing passer who finds runners on the break and in semi-transition, often on clever back-door cuts, and sucks defenders in on drives before dishing to a teammate for an easy dumpoff and dunk. Kansas also puts Jackson in a lot of 4-5 pick-and-rolls, where he can throw lobs to center Landen Lucas. A lot of times, prospects can put up impressive passing numbers simply by using a lot of possessions (Jackson’s assist percentage is 18.9 — very good for a non-point guard), but in this case, the eye test matches the numbers. Jackson is the truth.The one question with Jackson’s game is whether his jump shot is real. Jackson began the season shooting miserably from long range, going 23.7 percent on 2.1 3-point attempts per game in his first 18 games. But since late January, he’s been on a tear. In 13 games since Jan. 21, Jackson is shooting 51.3 percent on three 3-point attempts per game. That evens out to 38 percent on the season, but that kind of extreme swing is worth keeping in mind. As with any one-and-done prospect, we’re dealing in small sample sizes. But for Jackson, there’s at least some explanation for the inconsistency: His coaches aren’t touching his jump shot this season.“Now can he tighten it up and do some things differently? Absolutely,” Kansas coach Bill Self said in December. “But that will probably be on somebody else’s watch. That won’t be on our watch as much. I don’t see a reason why when you have a young man for a very brief period of time why you want to totally cloud his brain with something other than very, very few, simple things.”So the state of Jackson’s jumper over the next few weeks may not be the most important thing to focus on. But how able he is to adjust once he’s in the NBA will be crucial, as the difference between a wing prospect who can do it all and one who can do it all minus a jumper is the difference between an All-NBA-level talent and a useful role player.Jayson TatumFreshman F, 6-foot-8, DukeTatum is a down-the-middle wing prospect. He’s a good defender (allowing 73 points per 100 plays), a pretty good defensive rebounder (19.7 percent defensive rebound rate), a pretty good spot-up jump shooter (89 points per 100 plays, according to Synergy, although 12 of his 37 made threes for the year came during a three-game stretch in February), and a pretty good passer. But his underlying metrics don’t match up with his more obvious talents, such as when he broke out and averaged 22 points per game through the ACC tournament. The natural comparison for Tatum is Justise Winslow, another Duke swingman/small-ball 4 with obvious talents that can go unrecognized by college stats.If you are Vivek RanadiveMalik MonkFreshman PG, 6-foot-3, KentuckyOver the last several seasons, we’ve gotten a pretty clear idea of the tastes of Sacramento Kings owner Ranadive, as well as the forcefulness of his pursuit of those tastes. The Ranadive type is a guard in the mold of Ben McLemore, Nik Stauskas or Buddy Hield, a gunslinger who can shoot a team into the Final Four all on his own. This season, no player captures that type better than Kentucky’s Malik Monk. No offense to Monk.Monk is a shooter, and almost singlehandedly shoulders the load of 3-point shooting for Kentucky. This makes him a somewhat unique Kentucky guard, as he’s averaging nearly seven 3-point attempts per game and hitting 40 percent of them, which is impressive on its own, but more so when you consider that he’s doing it while dealing with extra defenders cheating off of backcourt mates De’Aaron Fox (24.2 percent from three) and Isaiah Briscoe (27.3 percent). For many NBA fans, March Madness is the embarrassing time of year when they realize that while they can recite, say, the Milwaukee Bucks’ bench rotation or the draft implications of a Sacramento Kings win, they can’t name more than a handful of college players. The tournament is the first time such fans will be seeing many of the players whom they’ll then discuss at length leading up to the NBA draft. So if you’re starting from zero, or are just looking for a quick refresher on a few prospects, here’s a viewing guide to the top lottery prospects in the tournament.If you’re looking for point guardsLonzo BallFreshman PG, 6-foot-6, UCLAChances are that most NBA fans have heard a little bit about Lonzo Ball. But much of the talk has been about his father, his brothers or his draft stock, rather than just how outstanding Ball has been on the court.First off, Ball is one of the most efficient scorers in the college game. His top-line analytics are staggering: Ball has a 66.7 true shooting percentage and scores 108 points per 100 plays; 56.3 percent of his field goal attempts are threes (he hits 41 percent of those). The overall efficiency is propped up a little because 31 percent of his plays (a massive chunk) have come in transition, where he scores 112 points per 100. Getting out and running is an effective strategy, and a big reason why the Bruins lead the NCAA with 90.4 points per game, but it’s not quite as telling for what Ball will be able to do in the NBA. For that, catch him spotting up for that broken-looking jumper of his — he scores 125 points per 100 plays on spot-ups, which is just as impressive as it sounds.Where Ball isn’t as polished is on the pick-and-roll — a play type that fellow top prospect Markelle Fultz of Washington excels at. Ball scores a more mediocre 78 points per 100 pick-and-roll plays. He’s also just a so-so rebounder for his size, with a 9.4 total rebound rate and 14.4 defensive rebound rate, neither of which is overly impressive for a 6-foot-6 superathlete.But those are all just individual stats. What makes Ball so special is that he can do all those things while also operating as a true point guard. Combine Ball’s individual stats with his passing numbers and the numbers begin to get silly. According to Synergy Sports Technology, he has an absurd 156 points per 100 plays on all plays he finishes — so when he shoots or draws a foul or commits a turnover — plus plays on which he records an assist. A little reference, since this isn’t the most common stat around: These plays + assist numbers tend to look a little inflated compared to what you usually see for players, because adding assists includes only made shots. This isn’t ideal, but it does give a good sense of the total contribution of a player, since adding more assists will nudge the number upward. Here are the numbers for some other top players: Fultz and Kentucky’s De’Aaron Fox are at 127p+a/100; Malik Monk of Kentucky is at 119; Josh Jackson of Kansas is at 116. Those are very good numbers, but Ball’s still stand out when compared apples-to-apples.De’Arron FoxFreshman PG, 6-foot-3, KentuckyThe line on Fox has been that he’s a jump shot away from being a top-five pick. So it’s telling that he’s still projected to be a late-lottery pick. On the year, Fox is scoring just 79 points per 100 plays on spot-up jumpers, according to Synergy, which is not very good at all. That’s not a great sign for a perimeter prospect, but Fox has one big thing working in his favor: speed.Fox is a burner, one of the fastest guards in the country, and puts that speed to material use in his game. He and backcourt mate Malik Monk are both in the top 15 of transition plays per game (5.6 per game for Fox, 5.7 for Monk). And once Fox is out in the open court, he can get to the rim at will. His penetration also carries him on isolation plays, where he’s strong (97 points per 100 plays). The question is whether Fox can combine those individual skills into an all-around game. He’s sitting on an assist percentage1The percentage of teammate field goals assisted by a player while he’s on the court. of 30, which is solid, but he doesn’t have the best passing instincts out on the break and can force things at the rim.VIDEO: Our picks for bracket success This perimeter workload has weighed down other parts of Monk’s game. As a prospect, he was known for killer athleticism, but he hasn’t gotten to the basket the way Fox has for the Wildcats: 80 percent of his shots in the halfcourt offense have been jumpers, according to Synergy. He’s scored an excellent 111 points per 100 plays on those jumpers, so it’s working out. But he’s even more efficient when he gets to the rim, either in half court or in transition.If you’re looking for big menLauri MarkkanenFreshman PF/C, 7-foot, ArizonaMarkkanen is a 7-foot freshman center out of Finland who lacks a true comparison in the modern game because I’ll be struck down by the Almighty if I invoke Arvydas Sabonis.Markkanen is sitting on a 63.3 true shooting percentage; 44.4 percent of his field goal attempts are threes, and he hits 43.2 percent of them. He isn’t just a jump shooter, though — Synergy has him averaging 125 points per 100 plays as the roll man in pick-and-roll and 102 points per 100 plays posting up — both excellent numbers. He is a bigger body than recent rangy big-man prospects like Nikola Mirotic but has more bounce than guys his size. This allows him to be a strong rebounder (17.7 defensive rebound rate) but also a live body filling the lane in transition or cutting off the ball. While Markkanen’s stats are impressive enough, he’s one of the guys in the tournament who are especially eye-opening in live action since a not-that-scrawny 7-footer moving around the court and doing the things he can do is a rare sight, even in the NBA.Check out our March Madness predictions. read more


Ohio State’s women’s volleyball starting lineup stands together prior to the game against No. 5 Minnesota on Oct. 18. Credit: Rebecca Farage | Lantern ReporterAfter being on the road for the last two weeks, the Ohio State women’s volleyball team (14-13, 7-9 Big Ten) will return to St. John Arena to host No. 5 Nebraska (22-4, 15-1 Big Ten) at 6 p.m. Friday and Iowa (17-12, 6-10) at 8 p.m. Saturday.With Nebraska currently riding nine-match winning streak, the Buckeyes have a tough match on their hands. Nebraska has only lost one Big Ten match to No. 12 Wisconsin.Ohio State head coach Geoff Carlston recognizes that Nebraska is one of the best serving teams in the conference and admits the Buckeyes have struggled in that area with this season.“We’ve done well against them, but they’re playing really well right now,” Carlston said. “We have to battle in the serve-and-pass game, so if we can do what I know we can do serving-wise then it gives us a little bit more advantage.”This will be the first meeting between Ohio State and Nebraska this season. The Buckeyes have beat the Huskers in three of their last four matches. However, Ohio State has only beat Nebraska once at home since both teams started playing in 1978. The Cornhuskers hold a 11-7 record against the Buckeyes in the all-time series.Though the Buckeyes have won 62 of 73 games against Iowa, they couldn’t pull out a win last week when they lost 3-1 to the Hawkeyes. The game ended Ohio State’s 15-match win streak against Iowa. The Hawkeyes have one of the top defensive specialists in the conference, senior Annika Olsen, who leads the Big Ten with 4.89 digs per set.The Buckeyes have struggled to maintain their momentum this season. Mauer admitted that while they did not always have a consistent flow, they have been able to adapt to the changes on their own team as well as on the other side of the net.“We don’t give up,” Mauer said. “I think we’re one of those teams that don’t let a ball drop and I think we’re just very scrappy and we make the other team work for it.” Carlston said he believes his team can be a little more disciplined in its plays and how it handles the ball.“[We need to] make [Nebraska and Iowa] earn every single point, like get in there and roll up our sleeves, blue collar defense and relentless pursuit of the ball,” Carlston said. “When we get a block we need to take advantage of that and run our offense behind it.”Mauer has recently had to step up as the starting setter of the team with junior setter Taylor Hughes sidelined with a season-ending injury Hughes.Carlston did not provide specifics regarding the injury, but said Hughes has been trying to work through it while mentoring Mauer and being another set of eyes for the team.“She’s our emotional leader. She’s our quarterback. But she’s also mentored Becca very well,” Carlston said. “Becca, as has happened a lot with us this year, she steps up and she’s doing a great job.”Though the multitude of injuries to the team has depleted Carlston of several starters, the absences have provided the freshmen on the team with an opportunity to start at an early age.“It’s kind of fun because we’re getting better every single day,” Carlston said. “It’s almost like a whole new season with our group because it’s just so different than maybe we were in August, September, even October.”Although the team has had to work through injuries and adjustments, Carlston is confident the team can fight through these next two games and make it to the final tournament.“We’re trying to keep that in mind, that we control our own destiny,” Carlston said. “But we know we have to play and we have to … fall in love with the process again which is hard to do here late in the season.” read more


first_imgReal Madrid skipper Sergio Ramos admits he has no influence over Julen Lopetegui’s future at the club despite rumours circulating that he may be axed.Madrid hit an all-time low as they continued their winless streak following Levante’s shocking win at the Bernabeu.“It’s a very bad run that Madrid can’t afford to be on,” the defender told Football Espana after Saturday’s 2-1 defeat to Levante, which piled the pressure on Lopetegui.“Without a goal in our last three [League] games, the team gave everything but didn’t have the rub of the green.Jose Mourinho, Lionel MessiMourinho: “Lionel Messi made me a better coach” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho believes the experience of going up against Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi at Real Madrid made him a greater coach.“The decision on our Coach goes beyond us. The players don’t make those decisions. For me, as captain, Julen Lopetegui has the support of the dressing room and players.“Individual mistakes have condemned us, but we mustn’t point the finger at anyone. The only way to turn things around is to be united.“Lopetegui is a very motivating and convincing person, and we must believe in him. He’s the first to believe. We need unity.“If I’m asked for an opinion then I’ll give one, but I don’t think it can influence a decision as important as whether a Coach stays on.”last_img read more


first_img Share This! Share This! Graphic courtesy of CAIR Graphic courtesy of CAIR News • Photos of the Week Graphic courtesy of CAIR Share This! Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 News Charitable organizations must “secure their institutions from manipulation by anonymous donors who are using tax breaks and loopholes within our system to hide their funding,” Barzegar said.Through a new national campaign, CAIR aims to help equip these philanthropic groups to divest from anti-Muslim groups. The report also encourages philanthropic institutions to audit grantmaking processes to determine whether their institution “intentionally or unintentionally” funded anti-Muslim groups and enact policies to prevent it from happening again.The list of funders also includes faith-based organizations, such as the Jewish Communal Fund — which gave $3,200,000 in grants to 31 anti-Muslim groups, including author Robert Spencer and far-right activist Pamela Geller’s American Freedom Defense Initiative — and the National Christian Foundation, which CAIR notes is the “second largest funder of anti-Muslim hate in America” and has funneled at least $15 million into the anti-Muslim industry.“Islamophobia has now embedded itself in mainstream philanthropic institutions and threatens American democracy,” said CAIR National Executive Director Nihad Awad. “We cannot counter Islamophobia until we understand this phenomenon, its strategies, its tactics, and who’s funding it.”Since 2010, CAIR’s annual Islamophobia reports have documented the financial and political connections of dozens of figures and organizations actively working to spread anti-Muslim propaganda. Graphic courtesy of CAIR Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Share This! By: Aysha Khan ayshabkhan Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email center_img Aysha Khan ayshabkhan Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — Nearly 1,100 philanthropic organizations have funneled almost $125 million into dozens of anti-Muslim groups from 2014 to 2016, helping once-fringe ideas shape public opinion and government policy, according to a new report from a civil rights group.The Council on American-Islamic Relations’ report, “Hijacked by Hate: American Philanthropy and the Islamophobia Network,” traces the flow of money from mainstream charities and foundations to 39 identified anti-Muslim special interest groups through anonymous donations. In all, the report identifies some $1.5 billion in private donations and other funds that have been made available to anti-Muslim organizations.“These anti-Muslim groups have more than a billion dollars in collective revenue that is used to advance an anti-Muslim agenda,” said Zainab Arain, CAIR’s national research and advocacy manager. “They lobby legislatures to pass anti-Muslim laws and policies, interfere in and falsify school curriculum and promote prejudicial and biased media content.”CAIR’s researchers spent more than a year examining thousands of pages of publicly available tax filings and records from searchable databases to see which groups charitable organizations funded from 2014 to 2016.The report then mapped out the deep-rooted connections between several prominent anti-Muslim groups that received such funding and Trump administration staff and anti-Muslim legislation that has been introduced in states around the country.The donations uncovered range from amounts of $20 to $32.4 million. Among the largest funders are mainstream philanthropic organizations like the Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund, the Adelson Family Foundation, the Schwab Charitable Fund, Donors Capital Fund Inc. and the Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program.“Unfortunately, along with the usual ideologically oriented actors, we have found mainstream charities and foundations being directly or indirectly involved in funneling anonymized donations to the Islamophobia network,” Arain said.Graphic courtesy of CAIRThe $1.5 billion those anti-Muslim groups have access to during the timeframe in question has been used to lobby for shutting down Muslim organizations, to stage anti-Muslim rallies and promote anti-Sharia bills in state legislatures across the country, Arain noted.“What these hate groups are doing is, they’re exploiting the robust tradition of American philanthropy and turning it around to hurt our democracy,” she said at a press conference in Washington, D.C., introducing the findings. “It’s not just an abstract thing. It has very real implications.”Vanguard Charitable alone has granted at least $2,709,500 to anti-Muslim groups. One of America’s largest donor-advised funds, which function like a charitable investment fund, Vanguard Charitable allows its clients to recommend where their money is given while preserving their anonymity.More than half of those dollars went to the Center for Security Policy, a far-right think tank that the Southern Poverty Law Center has called a “conspiracy-oriented mouthpiece for the growing anti-Muslim movement.” The Center for Security Policy was responsible for commissioning now-White House spokeswoman Kellyanne Conway’s polling company to produce a survey that showed that a quarter of Muslims in the U.S. believe violence against America is justified “as part of the global jihad.” Though the poll’s methodology has been widely criticized by researchers as unrepresentative and shaky, the Trump administration cited it to justify the travel ban on Muslim-majority countries.Vanguard Charitable, which donates billions to organizations like Doctors Without Borders and Boy Scouts of America, also gave to the Clarion Project, which describes itself as an organization that “educates the public about the dangers of radical Islam.” Center for American Progress Fear Inc. reports list the Clarion Project as one of the “main organizations fueling the Islamophobia network.”The Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund has donated to humanitarian organizations such as Unicef, the American Red Cross and the SPLC. But it has also donated more than $1,845,000 to 34 anti-Muslim groups, including $800,000 to the David Horowitz Center, a think tank led by a figure the SPLC has named a member of the U.S.’ “Anti-Muslim Inner Circle.”Many of the faith-based charities, private family foundations and commercial foundations listed in the report are mainstream prominent philanthropy organizations that researchers say may not have been aware of how their funds were used.“What we fear is that Schwab, Fidelity, Vanguard, even mainstream conservative groups… are being used by hatemongers to funnel money into places where they don’t want to show up and say ‘yes, I donated to so and so,’” said CAIR’s research and advocacy director, Abbas Barzegar. “The banks and charities themselves are unequipped to handle this.” By: Aysha Khan ayshabkhan Graphic courtesy of CAIR Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Graphic courtesy of CAIR In African refugee camps, app replaces Bibles left behind By: Aysha Khan ayshabkhan Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Tagsanti-Muslim bias CAIR hate homepage featured philanthropy Top Story,You may also like Catholicism Aysha Khan Aysha Khan is a Boston-based journalist reporting on American Muslims and millennial faith for RNS. Her newsletter, Creeping Sharia, curates news coverage of Muslim communities in the U.S. Previously, she was the social media editor at RNS.,Load Comments,Jean Vanier, Catholic hero to developmentally disabled, dies As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019last_img read more


first_imgThe George H. W. Bush Commemorative Forever Stamp is unveiled! #GHWBushStamp pic.twitter.com/LckWfhpgVq— George & Barbara Bush Foundation (@BushFdn) June 12, 2019 U.S. Postal Service via APThis photo provided by the U.S. Postal Service shows the new Forever stamp design honoring former President George H.W. Bush.The U.S. Postal Service unveiled Wednesday a Forever stamp honoring President George H.W. Bush, who passed away in Houston on November 30, 2018, at the age of 94.USPS held an event to officially issue the stamp at the Bush School of Government & Public Service in College Station. The former president is buried nearby at the Bush Presidential Library and Museum, next to his wife, Barbara, and their daughter, Robin.Pierce Bush, one of Bush’s grandchildren, attended the event, along with representatives of the USPS Board of Governors and the George & Barbara Bush Foundation. Bush served as President from 1989 to 1993. The continuing normalization of relations with the former Soviet Union after the cold war, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the First Gulf War in 1990 were some of the key milestones of his presidency.After his death, he was remembered for his service during World War II, as well as his statesmanship and lifetime of public service.The Bush family became an icon of Houston. They lived in the Bayou City before residing in Washington, D.C. and after the presidency. The former president and first lady gave Houston worldwide exposure. They frequented philanthropic and sports events and local restaurants, establishing a memorable bond with many Houstonians.The funerals for Barbara and George Bush were both held in Houston last year, with thousands of people attending to pay their last respects. center_img Sharelast_img read more


first_imgKolkata: Mystery shrouds the death of a 65-year-old woman whose body was found hanging in her own flat in Sahid Nagar area of Dhakuria on Sunday morning.Police said the victim Dipti Moitra (65) used to stay alone at her flat as her two sons live in Mumbai.The victim’s younger sister Kajol Das stays on the top floor of the same residential building. Das went to the victim’s flat on Sunday morning when she found her hanging.The victim’s younger sister immediately informed the matter to Garfa police station. After being informed, police reached the spot and recovered the body. The investigating officers found a suicide note from her room. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeAccording to the police, the suicide note that has been recovered from her room says that none was responsible for her death.The victim’s younger sister told police that she came downstairs as she wanted to go to a local shop.As she was going down stairs, she saw the deceased standing at the door and by the time she went closer, she figured that the victim was not standing but hanging from the front door.During interrogation, the younger sister claimed that she had called other inmates of the residential apartment immediately after the incident. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedPolice are awaiting the post-mortem report which might throw some light on the nature of her death. Police are examining the suicide note.The investigating officers are not ruling out a foul play behind the death of the victim.Some of the circumstantial evidence, however, suggests that the elderly woman have committed suicide.The reason behind her suicide is yet to be determined by the police.They are interrogating some of the neighbours of the victim and looking into if the victim had been suffering from depression. A case of unnatural death has been started by the police.last_img read more


first_imgIn today’s world, people are not only conscious about how they look but also how their skin feels and lipsticks are an important factor in making or breaking your image. This makeup tool is not just about different shades or textures but also about ingredients, application and choosing the right trends, say experts. Here are few tips about the lipstick trends that are making waves this season:The herbal route: Using vegan and organic lipstick not only protects the lips from harsh chemicals but also preserves the natural texture and colour of the lips. Applying lipsticks with less chemicals reduces chances of lip discolouration. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfShift from matte to creamy: Creamy matte or satin finish provide a soft and smooth look while leaving the right amount of colour and shine. Creamy Matte texture is also known to stay on the lips for longer hours and avoids the lipstick to get flaky on the lips.Ditch the nudes: Get over with the nudes already. A pale pink, a peachy coral or a vibrant fuchsia would be the perfect pick for the Indian skin this festive season. Applying natural pink lipsticks is perfect for the desk to dine look. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe blend of orange: As we know, red never goes out of style. However, this season it’s raining orange. A subtle blend of orange in your red can get you the perfect glamorous look for the season. Top glitter coat: A glitter top coat adds a gorgeous shimmering sheen, be it over a lipstick or applied straight to bare lips. Applying a subtle hint of glitter over your lips can make your lips pop just how you want them to. Apply your favourite lip colour and then a little amount of transparent gloss. Then add the glitter – this way, it will be fixed in all your lip. The unconventional bold shades: Unconventional bold shades like blue, purple and grey can be a game changer for parties if worn with confidence. Rocking a bold hue draws attention to your lips and makes you stand out.Nude mattes: Everyone is well acquainted with nude shades; natural matte lipsticks are perfect for day wear and also go with smokey eyes for evening wear. Use natural matte shades, a tone lighter or darker to give the perfect definition to your lips.Lip gradation: The latest lip trend of 2017 surely includes the gradation of the lips. A little more pop of colour in the middle of your lips making their way out lighter towards the edges.last_img read more


first_img 3 min read May 5, 2015 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global As the fields of robotics, machine learning and artificial intelligence become more sophisticated, the separation between ‘human’ jobs and ‘robotic’ ones continues to disintegrate.Tasks previously reserved for humans are being automated, a trend that is gaining steam. A 2013 report by Oxford researchers projected that by 2033, 47 percent of jobs in the U.S. could be performed by machines.So is your job safe?If you work in a creative field, the answer is probably yes. That’s according to a new report, called Creativity vs. Robots, co-written by Oxford researchers and Nesta, a London-based non-profit research and innovation group. By evaluating 702 professions in the U.S. for their required degree of creativity, the report estimates the likelihood that each position will be overtaken by robots in the near future.In a reversal of current economic realities, fine artists – actors, painters, dancers and musicians – can breathe the easiest. Along with other creative types, a group that includes graphic designers, architects, marketing directors, advertising managers, civil engineers and computer game programmers, their jobs, which the study identified as “highly creative,” will be among the last to be replaced machines.Related: This Is What Robots Will Be Doing in 2025Interestingly, when it comes to monetary gain, the study found an inverse U-shape relationship between the probability that an occupation is highly creative and the average income it delivers. Unsurprisingly, fine artists (your actors, painters, dancers and the like) reside on one side of the curve, making very little, on average, a year, while creative professions associated with the arrival of new technologies  bring in high annual salaries.Other professions the report predicts will continue to be executed by flesh and blood humans well into the future include:Translators and interpretors (5.8 percent risk of compurization within the next 10 to 20 years)Performing artists (7 percent)Architects (7.1 percent)Film and TV producers (8 percent)R&D on natural sciences (10.9 percent)Manufacture of watches and clocks (5.5 percent)General secondary education (9.6 percent)Unfortunately, most of the current jobs in the U.S. aren’t so safe; only 21 percent U.S. employment is classified as “highly creative,” which leaves a large swath of the working population vulnerable to replacement by robot.Many at risk positions are predicable – such as office administrators, call-center operators, loggers and super market cashiers — but the category also includes jobs that, on the surface at least, appear reasonably safe.Related: In Japan, a ‘Strange Hotel’ Will Be Staffed Almost Entirely By RobotsWith a 67.5 percent risk of computerization, it’s likely that bartending will soon be a profession of the past. On one hand, this makes sense: Multiple companies are betting big on the imminent popularity of cocktail robots (we’ve written about Somabar, a cocktail maker for the home, and similar, more upscale devices are being installed in restaurants across the country). But on the other hand, the estimation feels off: Going to a bar is a primarily social experience – is the appeal as great if you replace a chatty bartender with a machine?Apparently so. Here’s a list of other, potentially surprising occupations that are in danger of automation. (Advances in mobile robotics, data mining and computational statistics mean that “jobs that are considered creative today may not be so tomorrow,” the report warns.)Publication of directs and mailing lists (69.4 percent)News agency activities (64.5 percent)Risk and damage evaluation (58.6 percent)Event catering activities (52.7 percent)Sale of motor vehicles (45.7 percent) Register Now » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more


first_img07May Rep. Lucido to host benefit expo Categories: Lucido News State Rep. Peter Lucido of Shelby Township will host his third annual Salute to Seniors and Veterans on Monday, May 14. All local veterans and seniors are invited to attend this free event. Industry professionals and exhibitors from healthcare agencies, hospitals, and veterans groups will be available to answer questions on Social Security, insurance, tax assistance, GI Bill credits, mortgage assistance, long-term care, and other issues.“Our seniors and veterans have given so much to their communities and country,” Rep. Lucido said. “I look forward to honoring them and providing an opportunity to connect with the benefits they deserve.”The expo takes place on Monday, May 14 at The Palazzo Grande at 54660 Van Dyke in Shelby Township from 9 a.m. to noon. The event is free and a light breakfast will be served.Space is limited, so please RSVP with Rep. Lucido’s office by calling (888) MICH-REP or by email at PeterLucido@house.mi.gov.PHOTO INFORMATION: State Rep. Peter Lucido speaks with seniors and veterans at the 2017 Salute to Seniors and Veterans.last_img read more


first_imgWelcome to Invisibilia Season 4! The NPR program and podcast explores the invisible forces that shape human behavior, and we here at Goats and Soda are joining in for the podcast’s look at how a reality show in Somalia tried to do far more than crown a winning singer. The ultimate goal: to change human behavior.Once upon a time there was music in Somalia, but then the music started fading out. First one music radio station, then another, then another, until there was almost no music to hear and people started MacGyvering workarounds.One of the people who came up with a workaround was Xawa Abdi Hassan, a young woman who lived in a village outside Mogadishu.”We used to use a memory card, fill the memory card with music and listen to it from our phones,” Xawa says. In her house, as she cooked and cleaned, Hassan would sing along with the great Somali singers. But even in this private space she says she was careful. “I used to turn the volume down low, so no one could hear it.”The problem was al-Shabab, the Islamic extremist group that dominated large parts of the country. Al-Shabab didn’t like music. In 2009 it banned music at weddings, banished musical ringtones and starting punishing people who listened to music on their mobile phones by making them swallow their memory cards.Eventually the musicians themselves were targeted. The famous soloist Aden Hasan Salad was shot and killed in a tea shop, and others were murdered in the street.Through all of that, Xawa Abdi Hassan kept listening and practicing. Because she had a dream: “I just wanted to sing and become an entertainer.”For most of her life though — because of al-Shabab — this was a pretty far-fetched dream. Then in 2013 an unexpected and interesting opportunity emerged: There was going to be a new reality television show in Somalia, an American Idol-style show with singers competing.”As soon as I heard about it I knew I wanted to join,” Hassan says.What she didn’t know — what she couldn’t possibly know — was that this reality show was part of a much larger political plan.Using reality TV to change the worldThe plan was to create a musical reality show that could undermine the power of al-Shabab, or, in the language of the memo distributed to the people involved in the show’s creation, “undercut the messaging and brand appeal of armed extremist groups.”The United Nations, which was providing the money and support for the show, had concluded that a vivid display of Somali musical culture could serve “as a kind of inoculation against the austerity of Shabab,” Ben Parker told me. Parker was the head of communications for the U.N. in Mogadishu. He says that at this point — 2013 — al-Shabab had finally been pushed out of the capital, Mogadishu. But the situation in Somalia was far from stable. There were still regular attacks, so the new government (which had U.N. backing) needed to prove to Somalis that the power of the extremist group really was fading. This is why, Parker says, a musical reality show that challenged the power of the music-hating group was so appealing.”The beauty of a reality show is that the form itself achieves some of your goals,” he explains.After all, not only is there music in a musical reality show, there’s democratic voting and individual expression. So even in its form it communicates to its audience a very different way of being.This kind of indirect political messaging, Parker told me, is increasingly popular in strategic communications: “Those working in conflict … are less and less convinced of the value of weapons and more and more convinced that other approaches can deliver the dividends.”You get further with songs than with bombs.So is he right?Can a reality show actually change reality?It turns out this question has been systematically studied.The tricky science of changing what’s normalHow do people come to see the world around them as normal, an unremarkable fact, the way things are and should be? This is the question that interests Betsy Levy Paluck, a psychologist at Princeton University who studies media and how societies change.Paluck told me that for a long time people assumed the path to political or cultural change depended on crafting the right argument.”It was all rhetoric and no poetics,” she says.But starting in the 1990s, according to Paluck, poetics started gaining ground because psychologists realized that people consumed stories in this qualitatively different way.”Their defensiveness is disabled. Their counterarguing is at rest.”What Paluck wanted to understand was whether this difference in how we consumed stories translated into any changes in what we thought and how we behaved. So around 2004 she hooked up with an organization in Rwanda that was creating a new radio soap opera that was trying encourage tolerance between different ethnicities.And what Paluck found after a year of studying communities in Rwanda randomly assigned to listen to the soap opera was that their exposure had a surprising impact.”What it boiled down to was that despite the fact that people loved this program, it didn’t change their beliefs,” she says. “But it did change their perceptions of norms, and at the same time it changed their behaviors. Which is why I thought this is something significant.”Let me repeat that: It didn’t change their beliefs; it changed their behaviors by changing what they considered to be the social norm.That’s a sobering idea.”It’s a very uncomfortable thought,” Paluck says. “We like to think that all of our behaviors flow from our convictions, and what we do is a reflection of who we are and what we think. But we’re constantly tuning ourselves to fit in with the social world around us.”So what this work suggests is that if you change someone’s perception of what constitutes the social norm — as you convince people that the world is safe enough to sing in public even though in actual fact singing in public is incredibly dangerous — then you just might be able to move the needle on the ground.She took on extremists with her songWhich brings us back to Xawa Abdi Hassan, the young woman who quietly listened to music off a memory card and dreamed of being a singer.It took her some time to convince her family that it would be OK to compete in the show, called Inspire Somalia. Her mother was afraid that participating would turn her into a target, but ultimately she got permission.Hassan says when she first took the stage to compete, her hands were shaking, and not just because this could be a big break. There was another reason: Because of al-Shabab, she had never sung in public before.It was too dangerous.”That was my first time,” she says. “Before that, I did not sing in public places.”After Hassan two other contestants had their turns, both men. One had a famous musician father; the second, a man named Mustafa, had composed his own song.Once they finished came the part of the show supposed to serve as a democracy demonstration: the voting. Ballots were distributed to the audience and judges, and for a minute the room was quiet. In this small conference room in the middle of Mogadishu people bent over their ballots and considered the options before them.The son of the famous musician.The girl who practiced at home with the volume turned low.The boy who wrote his own song.In that room they consulted their hearts, weighed strengths and weaknesses, then marked the paper in their laps.It was Mustafa who ended up winning, but Hassan says she was honestly not upset. For her just the act of singing in public for the first time was enough. “I was happy as … like I was born that day.” she told me.In fact, Hassan is now a bit famous. People occasionally recognize her on the street, and even more important, she’s part of a professional singing group. As al-Shabab remains a force in Somalia, this means she is still at risk. She says she tries not to worry too much but is often spooked when she sees a car slow down when she’s walking. Still, she is committed to keep making music.”Yes, it is dangerous,” Hassan says. “But if the young person doesn’t stand up for his country and do what’s right, how is he helping his country?”Which brings us to this question: Did this reality show actually change reality in any way?It would be impossible to make the case that Somalia is a completely different country now. It isn’t.But there is at least one undeniable change since 2013. Music is back in the streets. Brought back, slowly and painfully, through a complicated combination of political strategy and personal courage. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more


first_imgIf you ate a hamburger today, or a high-priced steak, chances are it came from an animal that was fed an antibiotic during the last few months of its life.This is one of the most controversial uses of antibiotics in the entire food industry. There’s growing pressure on the beef industry to stop doing this. I wanted to know how hard that would be. My questions eventually led me to Phelps County Feeders, a cattle feedlot near Kearney, Neb. It was cold and wet on the day I visited. The weather had been bad for weeks. Joe Klute, the feedlot’s co-owner, was unhappy because he knew his 15,000 cattle were miserable, too. And miserable cattle don’t gain weight.”I mean, you spend all this time and energy and effort and money to put weight on them that you hope to get paid [for], and now it’s all going to be gone,” he said. “Because of the weather stress.”We head out to look at the raw ingredients of beef-making: giant bales of hay; piles of chopped up, fermented corn stalks and leaves called silage; steaming, flattened kernels of corn. “They get corn flakes for breakfast, just like we do,” he says with a grin.And then there are the micro-ingredients, like vitamins. They get dissolved in water and mixed into the truckloads of corn and hay. “On a 20,000-pound load, those micro-ingredients are going to be less than a pound,” Klute says.One of these micro-ingredients is an antibiotic called tylosin. It’s in there because when cattle eat a high-calorie diet, with lots of grain — which they do in feedlots, to fatten them up quickly during the last four to six months of their life — many will develop abscesses on the liver. T. G. Nagaraja, at Kansas State University, has spent most of his life studying this process. Fermenting grain produces acid in the bovine stomach that’s called the rumen, Nagaraja explains. When there’s lots of it, the acids can damage the rumen wall. This lets bacteria escape into the bloodstream and travel to the liver, where they get trapped, multiply, and cause abscesses.Liver abscesses don’t usually kill cattle, but they slow the animals’ growth and can make slaughtering operations more complicated. Nagaraja says that when cattle are fed a standard feedlot diet, 20 percent or more of them typically develop liver abscesses. Tylosin cuts that percentage by more than half, to single digits. This is, of course, great for the feedlot, but according to Lance Price, director of the Antibiotic Resistance Action Center at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., it’s not good at all for the rest of us.”It’s basically a public health decision that they’re making,” he says, and it’s a bad one, undermining the effectiveness of drugs that people depend on.Tylosin, for instance, is almost the same as an antibiotic that doctors often prescribe, called erythromycin. So when you feed tylosin to cattle, Price says, “it puts pressure on all the bacteria in and on that animal. Those bacteria respond to the antibiotic and eventually become resistant to it.”Those antibiotic-resistant bacteria can migrate away from the feedlot, perhaps carried by animal waste. If the bacteria then infect people, they can’t be treated with erythromycin.The Food and Drug Administration has banned some uses of antibiotics in animals for exactly this reason. Farmers can no longer use antibiotics to make cattle grow faster. Overall, their use of these drugs is down. But farmers still can give antibiotics to treat or prevent diseases like liver abscesses.This gets Lance Price kind of angry. “We are creating this disease,” he says. “We are creating liver abscesses by the way we’re raising [cattle].” Raise them differently, he says, and cattle wouldn’t need tylosin.In fact, it’s being done. It’s even being done at Phelps County Feeders. About 40 percent of the cattle at Joe Klute’s cold, wet feedlot are not getting any tylosin, or any growth-promoting hormones. This beef gets sold as an “all-natural” product under the company’s own brand: Nebraska Star Beef. The feedlot gets more money for it.”We decided, hey, it’s another avenue of survival. It’s another niche. Let’s find this niche; let’s try to be different,” Klute says. I also visited another, much smaller, feedlot in Iowa that’s completely antibiotic-free. It grows cattle for the company Niman Ranch.In both places, they’re doing it pretty much the same way.”We change how the animals are fed, and we don’t have to use tylosin,” says John Tarpoff, vice president of beef for Niman Ranch.They feed these cattle more hay and silage — and less energy-rich corn. This diet is easier on the animals’ stomachs. “The idea is, you have to protect the whole digestive system,” Tarpoff says.But there’s a trade-off. The animals grow more slowly when their diet is less energy-rich. To gain the same amount of weight, it can take these cattle about five months — as opposed to four months with conventional feeding. And some cattle — less than 10 percent of them — develop liver abscesses under this feeding regimen, too. That’s about the same as in feedlots that use a high-energy diet combined with tylosin. Another fly in the antibiotic-free ointment: Occasionally, cattle get sick with other diseases and need antibiotics. In that case, they’re treated and their meat is no longer sold as “natural.” Tarpoff says this happens to fewer than 1 percent of Niman Ranch’s cattle. At Phelps County Feeders, it’s between 5 and 10 percent.In case you’re wondering, these antibiotic-free cattle still are getting plenty of grain in their diet. That’s necessary, Tarpoff says, to produce the tender steaks that many consumers prefer.Because of the longer time and extra feed required to raise cattle this way, it costs more. Tarpoff estimates that it’s roughly 15 to 18 percent more. “We get the complaint all the time, ‘Gee, your product costs more than the other guy’s,’ ” he says. “Well, yeah, it does.” Some big customers are willing to pay for antibiotic-free production. They include Whole Foods and the fast-food chain Shake Shack.Last December, in perhaps the biggest shift in the industry away from antibiotics, McDonald’s announced that it’s taking steps to cut antibiotic use by its beef suppliers. I asked Tarpoff for his reaction. He sounded cautious.”It’s not so easily done,” he said. This industry, at least the mass-market part of it, has always been driven to cut costs. Cutting out the antibiotics will raise costs. “It’ll be interesting to see what happens,” he says. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more


first_img 2 min read Tell Us: What’s the Strangest Thing You’ve Found an Employee Doing on the Job? June 11, 2015 Add to Queue The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. –shares Nina Zipkin Entrepreneur Staffcenter_img 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Managing Employees Next Article Apply Now » We all have the crazy work story we trot out at dinner parties – the outrageous anecdote that sounds like it could have been a storyline on The Office, perhaps drawn from a holiday party gone awry or a company retreat that had a dearth of Internet access.Job site CareerBuilder recently asked more than 2,000 hiring managers to share the oddest thing employees have been caught doing while on the clock. The results range from the more benign – searching for cat photos (we’ve all done it, don’t lie) and taking naps (granted, in this case it was on the boss’s couch) – to the straight-up crazy, like taking a drone out for a test drive around the office and testing out hypnosis skills on smoker colleagues to get them to quit.Related: Mike Rowe: This One Thing Can Make Any Job Feel Like a Soul-Sucking Waste of TimeOther examples include:An employee who decided to take a sponge bath in the bathroom sink.An employee who was supposed to be out making deliveries and hit up a tanning salon instead.An employee who thought it would be a good idea to search for a mail order bride on their work computer.An employee who actually sabotaged a coworker’s tires.An employee who had a nip of vodka at their desk while catching up on their Netflix queue.We want to hear from you. What’s the strangest thing you’ve found an employee or co-worker doing at work? Let us know in the comments or on Facebook and Twitter.   Related: Use Design to Promote an Epic Office Culture Staff Writer. Covers leadership, media, technology and culture.last_img read more


first_img Apply Now » A Brazilian judge briefly blocked Facebook Inc.’s WhatsApp messaging service on Tuesday for failing to cooperate in a criminal investigation, before the nation’s top court overturned the measure in the third such incident since December.Federal Supreme Court President Ricardo Lewandowski said in a decision that it seemed “scarcely reasonable or proportional” for a judge in Rio de Janeiro state to have ordered the indefinite suspension of the messaging app until it revealed encrypted messages pertaining to a confidential case.Still, the criminal judge left some 100 million Brazilian users without access to the messaging app for hours on Tuesday afternoon, showing the vast and unpredictable discretionary power of Brazil’s lower courts.WhatsApp stood by its defense that messages sent over the app are not stored on its servers and cannot be turned over to the courts. Co-founder and Chief Executive Jan Koum even took to Facebook to vent his frustration with the recurring legal issues in Brazil.”It’s shocking that less than two months after Brazilian people and lawmakers loudly rejected blocks of services like Whatsapp, history is repeating itself,” he posted.The office of Brazil’s attorney general reiterated its position that judges who suspend WhatsApp are incorrectly interpreting a 2014 law meant to update the legal framework for the internet.Still, that guidance has not stopped judges frustrated with the modern limits of wiretaps in drug-trafficking investigations from going after the service and even briefly jailing a senior Facebook executive in March.”As we’ve said in the past, we cannot share information we don’t have access to,” said a WhatsApp spokesperson in a public statement.(Reporting by Brad Haynes; Additional reporting by Alberto Alerigi Jr and Guillermo Parra-Bernal in Sao Paulo, Rodrigo Viga Gaier in Rio de Janeiro; Editing by Cynthia Osterman and David Gregorio) Add to Queue –shares Reuters Image credit: Twin Design / Shutterstock.com The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Why Did a Judge Block 100 Million WhatsApp Users?center_img WhatsApp 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List July 20, 2016 Next Article 2 min read This story originally appeared on Reuterslast_img read more


first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 14 2018Dr. Marise Parent, professor and associate director of the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University, has received a three-year, $1.2 million federal grant to study how brain areas involved in memory control eating behavior.The grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health will be used to explore how the hippocampus, a brain structure that is critical for memory and learning, inhibits eating behavior at a biochemical level. The project’s ultimate goal is to identify new pharmacological and behavioral strategies for treating diet-induced obesity and other eating-related disorders.Parent is the principal investigator for the project. Georgia State collaborators include Dr. Daniel Cox, associate professor in the Neuroscience Institute, and Dr. Aaron Roseberry, associate professor in the Department of Biology, in addition to a scientist from the University of Iowa.Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaParent and her colleagues hypothesize that memory can be a powerful tool for controlling eating behavior because it provides a record of recent energy intake that likely outlasts most physiological signals generated by a meal.”When you decide what you’re going to eat, how much you’re going to eat and if you’re going to eat now, often those decisions are influenced by your memory of what you’ve recently eaten,” Parent said. “Your memory can keep a really good record of what you’ve just eaten and influence your future eating behavior, but we don’t know which brain areas accomplish this and how it is achieved at the biochemical level. That’s what we’ll study with this grant.”Scientists recognize the brain influences humans to eat when there’s a need or deficiency and to feel good or experience pleasure.”We have been arguing that it is important to consider the role of other kinds of controls in the brain that we call cognitive controls,” Parent said. “Those might actually be more easily modified by intervention, so we should really understand how those work if we want to understand problems associated with overeating or undereating. If you don’t understand how brain areas involved in cognition control eating, then your understanding of how the brain controls eating is incomplete.”The other piece that’s interesting is that if you damage the hippocampus, it turns out you’ll eat sooner and you’ll overeat. A lot of things damage your hippocampus, like obesity, PTSD, depression, alcoholism and stress. So, all of those things might contribute to overeating through a novel mechanism that hasn’t been previously considered, by actually impairing your memory and impairing the functioning of this brain area.”Source: https://news.gsu.edu/2018/11/13/researcher-gets-1-2-million-federal-grant-to-study-how-brain-controls-eating-behavior/?last_img read more


Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 18 2018A federal court ordered a Michigan-based food manufacturer to discontinue selling food products until the company complies with federal regulations and other requirements. This action follows several inspections conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, which found Listeria monocytogenes (L. mono) in the company’s food preparation area.U.S. District Judge Paul L. Maloney for the Western District of Michigan entered a consent decree of permanent injunction on Nov. 30, 2018, between the U.S. and Saranac Brand Foods, and the company’s co-owners, Dennis M. Nowak and Daniel R. Nowak. Saranac Brand Foods specialized in manufacturing a variety of 35 different ready-to-eat foods including prepared salads, dips and sauces.The consent decree prohibits the defendants from receiving, preparing, processing, packing, holding, labeling and/or distributing foods at or from their facility, or any other facility, until certain requirements are met. The defendants told the court they discontinued all food operations in August 2018 and intend to dissolve the company. If the defendants choose to resume operations, the consent decree requires them to notify the FDA and take corrective actions before resuming operations.”The FDA and the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development have documented a pattern of food safety violations at this facility. The inappropriate and unsafe practices of Saranac Brand Foods. not only violated the law, but also put consumers in harm’s way,” said FDA Associate Commissioner for Regulatory Affairs Melinda Plaisier. “This type of behavior is unacceptable to the FDA and is why we took action to prevent the defendants from introducing contaminated or potentially contaminated food products into the marketplace.”Related StoriesLean manufacturing methods spur innovations in the testing of drug delivery devicesNew personalized prosthetic liners could help more amputees walk againResearchers improve training modules for future surgeons with 3D printingAccording to the complaint, filed by the U.S. Department of Justice on behalf of the FDA, FDA and state officials inspected the facility several times since 2012 and found L. mono in the facility during three separate inspections. The inspections also documented that the defendants were processing food under insanitary conditions, in violation of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). L. mono is a pathogenic bacterium that can cause listeriosis, a rare but potentially life-threatening illness. People with compromised immune systems, the elderly, pregnant women and developing fetuses are particularly susceptible to listeriosis.In August 2016, the FDA issued the defendants a Warning Letter, informing them of the L. mono contamination and objectionable conditions at the facility. The Warning Letter emphasized the serious nature of the deficiencies and stated that it was the defendants’ responsibility to ensure that their products comply with the FD&C Act. In November 2017, the FDA’s investigators issued the defendants a list of inspectional observations that identified insanitary conditions observed during a follow-up inspection.Consumers are encouraged to contact the FDA to report problems with any FDA-regulated products.The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products. Source:https://www.fda.gov read more