first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your say ​Bournemouth boss Howe has no regrets over Defoe signingby Ansser Sadiq10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveEddie Howe does not regret signing Jermain Defoe.The former England international is heading to Rangers on an 18-month loan deal, per Sky Sports News.And despite the fact he had a limited impact in his stay at the Cherries, Howe does not feel the transfer was a mistake.”The deal (signing Defoe) has been a good one from our perspective, I would do it again in a heartbeat,” he said in his press conference.”He scored some massive goals for us last year, I don’t think anyone should forget that.”Then you add the other value that he brings in the changing room and on the training pitch. He’s definitely been a role model for a lot of our younger players. As I say it’s something I would do again and again if given the same circumstances.” last_img read more


first_imgAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your say ​Man City midfielder Rodri: Season far from overby Ansser Sadiqa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City midfielder Rodri does not believe the club’s league season is over.Some fans and pundits are already declaring Liverpool hot favourites for the Premier League, given they have a five point lead over City.But Rodri knows that it is still early days, and that every team will slip up in the title race.”The season is very long,” he said to City’s website.”You are going to have matches like this, at least two or three. It’s normal. We are not perfect, and the good thing is we are at the start of the season, not the end.”That’s the only positive thing we can say. We are five points behind the leaders and that’s bad news but we are working and we will keep pushing.” last_img read more


first_imgESPN College Football Playoff top 2015.ESPNWe’re now less than two months away from the start of the 2016 college football season. Get excited, people. In anticipation of the start of the upcoming season, let’s take a look at what ESPN’s preseason top 25 looks like. Can anyone but the defending national champions be No. 1? Nope. ESPN has the Crimson Tide at No. 1 heading into the season. Do they have it right?Here’s the full top 25.  Will Alabama get some more rings this season?Will Alabama get some more rings this season? 1. Alabama 2. Clemson 3. Michigan 4. Florida State 5. Oklahoma 6. LSU 7. Stanford 8. Notre Dame 9. Ohio State 10. Tennessee 11. USC 12. Georgia 13. Ole Miss 14. Oklahoma State 15. Michigan State 16. Washington  17. Houston 18. North Carolina 19. Oregon 20. TCU 21. Texas A&M 22. UCLA 23. Iowa 24. Miami 25. Louisville[ESPN]last_img read more


first_imgAPTN National NewsOuje-Bougoumou is about a 10-hour drive north of Ottawa.For decades the people lived off the land.But Indian Residential Schools and passing missionairies changed everything.The switch to Christianity has, for the most part, replaced traditional teachings and spiritual ceremonies.APTN National News reporter Annette Francis and cameraman Jason Leroux went there to explore what happened and what people today are doing to get the old ways back.Here is part one – a history lesson.last_img


first_imgWelcome to Invisibilia Season 4! The NPR program and podcast explores the invisible forces that shape human behavior, and we here at Goats and Soda are joining in for the podcast’s look at how a reality show in Somalia tried to do far more than crown a winning singer. The ultimate goal: to change human behavior.Once upon a time there was music in Somalia, but then the music started fading out. First one music radio station, then another, then another, until there was almost no music to hear and people started MacGyvering workarounds.One of the people who came up with a workaround was Xawa Abdi Hassan, a young woman who lived in a village outside Mogadishu.”We used to use a memory card, fill the memory card with music and listen to it from our phones,” Xawa says. In her house, as she cooked and cleaned, Hassan would sing along with the great Somali singers. But even in this private space she says she was careful. “I used to turn the volume down low, so no one could hear it.”The problem was al-Shabab, the Islamic extremist group that dominated large parts of the country. Al-Shabab didn’t like music. In 2009 it banned music at weddings, banished musical ringtones and starting punishing people who listened to music on their mobile phones by making them swallow their memory cards.Eventually the musicians themselves were targeted. The famous soloist Aden Hasan Salad was shot and killed in a tea shop, and others were murdered in the street.Through all of that, Xawa Abdi Hassan kept listening and practicing. Because she had a dream: “I just wanted to sing and become an entertainer.”For most of her life though — because of al-Shabab — this was a pretty far-fetched dream. Then in 2013 an unexpected and interesting opportunity emerged: There was going to be a new reality television show in Somalia, an American Idol-style show with singers competing.”As soon as I heard about it I knew I wanted to join,” Hassan says.What she didn’t know — what she couldn’t possibly know — was that this reality show was part of a much larger political plan.Using reality TV to change the worldThe plan was to create a musical reality show that could undermine the power of al-Shabab, or, in the language of the memo distributed to the people involved in the show’s creation, “undercut the messaging and brand appeal of armed extremist groups.”The United Nations, which was providing the money and support for the show, had concluded that a vivid display of Somali musical culture could serve “as a kind of inoculation against the austerity of Shabab,” Ben Parker told me. Parker was the head of communications for the U.N. in Mogadishu. He says that at this point — 2013 — al-Shabab had finally been pushed out of the capital, Mogadishu. But the situation in Somalia was far from stable. There were still regular attacks, so the new government (which had U.N. backing) needed to prove to Somalis that the power of the extremist group really was fading. This is why, Parker says, a musical reality show that challenged the power of the music-hating group was so appealing.”The beauty of a reality show is that the form itself achieves some of your goals,” he explains.After all, not only is there music in a musical reality show, there’s democratic voting and individual expression. So even in its form it communicates to its audience a very different way of being.This kind of indirect political messaging, Parker told me, is increasingly popular in strategic communications: “Those working in conflict … are less and less convinced of the value of weapons and more and more convinced that other approaches can deliver the dividends.”You get further with songs than with bombs.So is he right?Can a reality show actually change reality?It turns out this question has been systematically studied.The tricky science of changing what’s normalHow do people come to see the world around them as normal, an unremarkable fact, the way things are and should be? This is the question that interests Betsy Levy Paluck, a psychologist at Princeton University who studies media and how societies change.Paluck told me that for a long time people assumed the path to political or cultural change depended on crafting the right argument.”It was all rhetoric and no poetics,” she says.But starting in the 1990s, according to Paluck, poetics started gaining ground because psychologists realized that people consumed stories in this qualitatively different way.”Their defensiveness is disabled. Their counterarguing is at rest.”What Paluck wanted to understand was whether this difference in how we consumed stories translated into any changes in what we thought and how we behaved. So around 2004 she hooked up with an organization in Rwanda that was creating a new radio soap opera that was trying encourage tolerance between different ethnicities.And what Paluck found after a year of studying communities in Rwanda randomly assigned to listen to the soap opera was that their exposure had a surprising impact.”What it boiled down to was that despite the fact that people loved this program, it didn’t change their beliefs,” she says. “But it did change their perceptions of norms, and at the same time it changed their behaviors. Which is why I thought this is something significant.”Let me repeat that: It didn’t change their beliefs; it changed their behaviors by changing what they considered to be the social norm.That’s a sobering idea.”It’s a very uncomfortable thought,” Paluck says. “We like to think that all of our behaviors flow from our convictions, and what we do is a reflection of who we are and what we think. But we’re constantly tuning ourselves to fit in with the social world around us.”So what this work suggests is that if you change someone’s perception of what constitutes the social norm — as you convince people that the world is safe enough to sing in public even though in actual fact singing in public is incredibly dangerous — then you just might be able to move the needle on the ground.She took on extremists with her songWhich brings us back to Xawa Abdi Hassan, the young woman who quietly listened to music off a memory card and dreamed of being a singer.It took her some time to convince her family that it would be OK to compete in the show, called Inspire Somalia. Her mother was afraid that participating would turn her into a target, but ultimately she got permission.Hassan says when she first took the stage to compete, her hands were shaking, and not just because this could be a big break. There was another reason: Because of al-Shabab, she had never sung in public before.It was too dangerous.”That was my first time,” she says. “Before that, I did not sing in public places.”After Hassan two other contestants had their turns, both men. One had a famous musician father; the second, a man named Mustafa, had composed his own song.Once they finished came the part of the show supposed to serve as a democracy demonstration: the voting. Ballots were distributed to the audience and judges, and for a minute the room was quiet. In this small conference room in the middle of Mogadishu people bent over their ballots and considered the options before them.The son of the famous musician.The girl who practiced at home with the volume turned low.The boy who wrote his own song.In that room they consulted their hearts, weighed strengths and weaknesses, then marked the paper in their laps.It was Mustafa who ended up winning, but Hassan says she was honestly not upset. For her just the act of singing in public for the first time was enough. “I was happy as … like I was born that day.” she told me.In fact, Hassan is now a bit famous. People occasionally recognize her on the street, and even more important, she’s part of a professional singing group. As al-Shabab remains a force in Somalia, this means she is still at risk. She says she tries not to worry too much but is often spooked when she sees a car slow down when she’s walking. Still, she is committed to keep making music.”Yes, it is dangerous,” Hassan says. “But if the young person doesn’t stand up for his country and do what’s right, how is he helping his country?”Which brings us to this question: Did this reality show actually change reality in any way?It would be impossible to make the case that Somalia is a completely different country now. It isn’t.But there is at least one undeniable change since 2013. Music is back in the streets. Brought back, slowly and painfully, through a complicated combination of political strategy and personal courage. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more


first_imgThe Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has been criticised for failing to treat as a disability hate crime a case in which a disabled man was forced to work for a pittance and live in a shed for 35 years.Three people were convicted unanimously by a jury last week of requiring the 52-year-old man to perform forced or compulsory labour, after a four-week trial at Oxford Crown Court.The man, who has learning difficulties, was forced to live in a brick shed that was described as unfit for human habitation, and to undertake heavy manual labour, working for more than 12 hours a day, for which he was paid just £5 a day.If he failed to work hard enough he was beaten, on at least one occasion with a metal bar.The three defendants also applied for and collected his benefits – worth £139,000 – for 13 years and as a result were also convicted of conspiracy to defraud following a trial last November.They will be sentenced next month for this charge, and the forced labour, but CPS has already confirmed to Disability News Service that the offences have not been treated as disability hate crime.A linked case, which in June last year saw another four defendants convicted of forced labour, involving another man with learning difficulties in the same area of Oxford, was also not treated as disability hate crime.Thames Valley Police, which carried out both investigations, was unable to comment on the latest case this week because the officer dealing with the case was on leave.But a CPS spokesman said: “Disabled people face criminal behaviour every day. “Sometimes, this will be motivated by hostility towards their disability and on other occasions they will be in at-risk situations and exploited because of that.“We considered prosecuting this case as a disability hate crime but could not identify any evidence to show the offence had been committed because of hostility towards the victim based on his disability.“The offenders saw an opportunity to exploit the victim for their own personal gain.“Sentencing is a matter for the courts but the CPS will ask that a victim’s disability is taken into account.”Anne Novis (pictured), a leading disabled hate crime campaigner and a coordinator of the Disability Hate Crime Network, said: “Repeatedly we have to ask the question, ‘Why?’“Why is it not a disability hate crime when a disabled person is abused, humiliated, stolen from, made to do work they do not want to do?“For us, it is common sense that if someone is targeted due to perceived ‘vulnerability’ and that ‘vulnerability’ is due to being a disabled person then that is hate crime.“No matter what the law or the CPS say, we, disabled people, are the experts. We know what is or is not hate crime and it is our voice, our perception, and that of the victim that should take precedence.“It is obvious that the justice system still has a lot of work to do on this issue. Such cases do not inspire our confidence.”Meanwhile, a new CPS report has shown that the number of cases of disability hate crime prosecuted in 2015-16 increased by more than 40 per cent compared with the previous year, rising from 666 to 941.The number of convictions also rose by more than 40 per cent, from 503 to 707, although the conviction rate fell slightly, from 75.5 per cent to 75.1 per cent (it was as high as 81.9 per cent in 2013-14).The report says CPS will “identify and execute further work necessary to address the relatively low conviction rate”, comparing it with the overall hate crime conviction rate of 83.2 per cent.The number of cases in which the sentence was increased because the court accepted the offences were disability hate crimes also rose, from 5.4 per cent of successfully prosecuted disability hate crime cases in 2014-15 to 11.9 per cent of such cases in 2015-16. This rate had been as low as 0.6 per cent in 2013-14.The CPS report said the figure still remained “considerably lower” than for other hate crime strands, and promised to work internally to “sustain continuing improvement”, while work would “also be undertaken with the courts to ensure consistent application of sentence uplifts”.The report also revealed that the proportion of both 10-13 year olds and 14-17-year-olds involved as defendants in disability hate crime prosecutions fell from 4.9 per cent and 23.5 per cent in 2007-08 to 1.3 per cent and 9.6 per cent in 2015-16.The report says: “The CPS benefits from a strong relationship with communities affected by disability hate crime as a result of a combination of structured engagement and transparent performance and hopes that, together with an improved conviction rate, community confidence will continue to grow.“In turn, it is hoped that this will provide an environment in which increased numbers of those affected by hate crime will feel able to report.”Stephen Brookes, another leading hate crime campaigner and DHCN coordinator, said the increase in prosecutions was “good news”.But he warned against complacency, and added: “There are still far too many inconsistencies in police, CPS and the judiciary responses, and the gap shown between good and bad practice is massive.”He said the work done by the network had been “a key part of the improvements seen today, and the message from us is, ‘The fight isn’t won yet.’“Rather, we are at the beginning of the real battle of getting closer cooperation between all partners, criminal justice system, disabled people, academics, and the media, who can help with the message that disability hate crime is on its way out.”last_img read more


first_img 2 min read Tell Us: What’s the Strangest Thing You’ve Found an Employee Doing on the Job? June 11, 2015 Add to Queue The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. –shares Nina Zipkin Entrepreneur Staffcenter_img 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Managing Employees Next Article Apply Now » We all have the crazy work story we trot out at dinner parties – the outrageous anecdote that sounds like it could have been a storyline on The Office, perhaps drawn from a holiday party gone awry or a company retreat that had a dearth of Internet access.Job site CareerBuilder recently asked more than 2,000 hiring managers to share the oddest thing employees have been caught doing while on the clock. The results range from the more benign – searching for cat photos (we’ve all done it, don’t lie) and taking naps (granted, in this case it was on the boss’s couch) – to the straight-up crazy, like taking a drone out for a test drive around the office and testing out hypnosis skills on smoker colleagues to get them to quit.Related: Mike Rowe: This One Thing Can Make Any Job Feel Like a Soul-Sucking Waste of TimeOther examples include:An employee who decided to take a sponge bath in the bathroom sink.An employee who was supposed to be out making deliveries and hit up a tanning salon instead.An employee who thought it would be a good idea to search for a mail order bride on their work computer.An employee who actually sabotaged a coworker’s tires.An employee who had a nip of vodka at their desk while catching up on their Netflix queue.We want to hear from you. What’s the strangest thing you’ve found an employee or co-worker doing at work? Let us know in the comments or on Facebook and Twitter.   Related: Use Design to Promote an Epic Office Culture Staff Writer. Covers leadership, media, technology and culture.last_img read more


first_imgBroadridge’s 2019 Artificial Intelligence (AI) Outlook Survey reveals majority of financial services firms see value in AI for data mining, but legacy technology is a continuing impedimentThe financial services industry’s top priority for AI applications is Fresh Relevance,, according to the second annual AI Outlook Survey from Broadridge Financial Solutions Inc., a global Fintech leader that is part of the S&P 500® Index. The survey results, released today, explore the state of AI adoption and readiness among U.S. financial services companies. Data mining (36%) was followed by post-trade processing (20%), market analytics (13%) and trading systems (12%). Broadridge polled operations, technology and regulatory leaders from across the financial services industry and released the findings in conjunction with a white paper focused on AI adoption.The Age of AI?Comparing and relating the progress of AI initiatives to relevant historical eras, a clear majority of respondents (84%) say their company is in or past “The Enlightenment Age” of AI, during which they are at or beyond proof of concept. Twenty-nine percent of companies have moved into the “Industrial Age” with pilots and one-fifth (20%) are in the modern “Information Age” with AI in full production.Though most companies are in some stage of AI adoption, or at least exploration, a cautious 10% remain in the Stone Age with no current plan to leverage AI. Broadridge’s white paper is paired with the AI Readiness Assessment, which helps firms establish the strategy, structure, systems, skills and staff needed to create a successful AI program.“While most organizations recognize that AI is a transformational technology with huge potential impact, their approach to adoption has been cautious. The survey data and white paper demonstrate how to harness the power of AI and successfully increase its adoption by first establishing a clear strategy and framework,” said Michael Tae, head of strategy for Broadridge. “At Broadridge, we are focused on what we call ‘the ABCDs of innovation’™: AI, blockchain, the Cloud, digital and beyond. This is how we define our continued commitment to driving the innovation roadmap; helping our clients understand and apply next-generation technologies to transform business, optimize efficiency and generate growth.Marketing Technology News: DXC Technology 600 Brings Great INDYCAR Racing, “Digital Fan Experience of the Future” to Texas Motor SpeedwayAI’s Productivity Boost Blocked by Legacy TechnologyRespondents also ranked their top motivations or desired outcomes for investing in AI. Half (53%) cited “increased efficiency and productivity” as their top motivation and a majority (84%) included it in their top three. Other top-three motivations among respondents included enhanced data and security (69%) and the ability to redeploy human capital (51%).While it’s encouraging that a high number of respondents understand the advantages of AI’s capabilities, roadblocks continue to impede implementation. Nearly half of respondents (46%) cited legacy technology as their top challenge. This tracks with the difficulties associated with modifying or replacing a current infrastructure and the potential need for vendor or personnel changes. Cost of investment/perceived ROI was named the second largest roadblock (31%), while executive buy-in was considered a challenge by only 7% of respondents.Marketing Technology News: Step Raises $22.5 Million Series A Led by Stripe to Disrupt Banking for TeensAvengers Style: Wall Street’s Relationship with AI PartnersWhen asked which superhero relationship best describes their company’s interaction with AI technology partners, a majority (58%) chose “The Avengers,” alluding to their desire for teamwork. Conversely, 8% admitted to having an adversarial relationship with their Fintech partners, likening it to that of Batman and the Joker. Other respondents compared their technology-related relationships to that of “frenemies” like Professor X and Magneto (16%) and internal conflict like The Hulk’s (14%). The power of partnership for planning smooth AI adoption is clear and prevalent for financial services professionals and technology vendors.The Four Stages of AI Adoption The corresponding Broadridge white paper reveals the four stages of AI adoption — beginner, experimenter, fast follower and innovator — and how they differ from the stages that have played out in previous waves of technology transformation. According to the white paper, AI algorithms are often self-teaching and improve over time, making them opaque and difficult for competitors to copy or reverse engineer. Those in the innovator stage truly have an advantage over fast followers and experimenters.Marketing Technology News: L.A. Lakers Partner Wish Jumps to No. 1 in Earned Social Media Value Among NBA Jersey Patch Sponsors Age of AIAI technologyBroadridge Financial SolutionsFresh RelevanceNews Previous ArticleInfluencer Marketing Is Maturing: Here’s What You Need to KnowNext ArticleGoldilocks Principle of Marketing: The Need for a Consistent View of the Consumer Journey The Age of AI and Wall Street PRNewswireJune 16, 2019, 5:00 pmJune 14, 2019 last_img read more


first_imgIn May, EasyStack launched its latest generation private cloud product ECS (EasyStack Cloud Service). EasyStack is an open source Cloud Computing company. It is a Cloud platform with features designed and delivered according to a true private cloud. The ECS was produced from an 18-month long effort spearheaded by EasyStack’s research and development team, laying foundation on the full range of products such as ECS Stack Hyper Converged Infrastructure, ECS Enterprise, and several scenario based ECS Enterprise editions, elevating the product capability to a whole new level.A recent global survey of 300 enterprises has found out that most plan to move their existing applications to Multi-Cloud Business/ SaaS by 2021. Culminating on private Cloud best practices while serving over 500 large and medium size enterprises and designed using innovative distributed micro-services on a unified integrated platform, the new-generation private Cloud ECS aims to help enterprise customers achieve their EVOLVABLE experience of service capabilities, product form-factor and ability to support multiple scenarios, ultimately enabling organizations to strategize and execute digital transformation and business innovation agenda with ease.Cloud Deployment Still Calls for the Need to Provide Consistent Cloud ExperienceCompanies like Oracle, SAP, and IBM already lead the race owing to their Cloud Experiences. Oracle Cloud delivers the broadest selection of enterprise-grade cloud computing solutions, including SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS. IBM recently closed their deal with Red Hat placing $34 billion bet on transforming digital experiences for their join Public and Private Cloud customers.Read Also: mGage Collaborates with Oracle Marketing Cloud to Deliver …Chen Xilun, founder and CEO of EasyStack, commented,“The new-generation private cloud is the private deployment of cloud. We all agree both private and public cloud are cloud-centric, with the aim of satisfying the customer need: moving the cloud to the data. Simply, data inside a firewall needs a private deployment of cloud, while data outside a firewall needs a public deployment of cloud. Hence, even though private and public clouds are distinct and separate, the user perspective on both private deployment and public deployment of cloud still calls for the need to provide consistent cloud experience”.Liu Guohui, co-founder and CTO of EasyStack, emphasized —“Different from being upgradable, EVOLVABLE requires an evolution in service capability, product modularity and supporting scenarios. This means that, EVOLVABLE must ensure the evolvability of service capabilities of the cloud platform itself; being EVOLVABLE also means it should be able to adapt to cloud-ready hyper converged architecture integrating hardware and software, private cloud, industry cloud and multi-cloud solution deployed across different modular form-factors; and finally in terms of supporting scenarios, EVOLVABLE represents the ability to cater to wide ranging enterprise requirements across compute, network, storage building blocks, to commercial storage and commercial SDN (Software Defined Networking), from virtualization to bare-metal and container clusters, and from DevOps to IoT”.Recommended: Zeta Global and PlaceIQ Announce Strategic Partnership to Enhance …4 Benefits of Deploying Evolving Cloud InfrastructureIn view of private deployment of cloud, the new-generation private cloud offers the following benefits.First, applying it to the business tier, ECS supports new-generation enterprise applications such as Cloud, Mobile, IoT, BigData and AI.Second, serving Platform as a Service (PaaS) experience, it supports many types of applications through building a sharable Kubernetes-based PaaS across private and public clouds based on the ecosystem primarily dominated by open source PaaS; in fact, enterprise customers may choose to develop a new on-demand PaaS in the cloud and cater it to specific scenarios and/or industries.Latest MarTech News: OpenText Announces the Next Generation Enterprise Information …Third, Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) implementation, it can offer enterprise customers consumer experience as in public clouds. Specifically, not only does it provide a complete turnkey project from on-boarding, delivery, operations & maintenance (O&M) to upgrading, but also brings about its pay-per-use service model, transitioning business and technology into the cloud service era from the cloud software eraFourth, consider the product evolution journey.The best option for evolution of the new-generation private cloud is open source ecosystem based transition approach. Keeping the new-generation private cloud compatible and aligned with the open source ecosystem, on one hand, allows it to be fully compatible with the community, and on the other hand, satisfy customers’ requirement through scenario based design and integration approach. This is a must for replacing custom designed clouds with the equivalent of scenario based solution within a complex environment and potentially leads to an enhanced PaaS ecosystem as well.Fifth, in terms of evolution approach, being EVOLVABLE is the most important characteristic of the new-generation private Cloud and is also its core feature. Decoupling software and hardware components allow software to be EVOLVABLE and hardware becoming up-gradable, truly unleashing the longer term value of the Cloud platform and thereby changes the competitive landscape of this industry.Read Also: Vonage Wins 2019 ContactCenterWorld Top Ranking Performer AwardNew-Generation Private Cloud Is the Private Deployment of CloudUnlike traditional custom designed and piecemeal implemented private cloud, the core capabilities of this new-generation private cloud is modeled to meet the demands of complex environment and data residing behind enterprise customers’ secured firewall setup. In a nutshell, it is the ability to construct a private cloud centered on customers’ data and at the same time having a multi-cloud platform that can manage multiple cloud providers both public and private.In a Nutshell: Ad Fraud to Cost North American Advertisers $100 Million a Day by …Equally important are characteristics such as compatibility with the vast hardware and software ecosystem, allowing co-existence of both new-generation and traditional enterprise applications to run and operate on, EVOLVABLE features when responding to the complex environment of business enterprises, yet offering consumer based experience similar to public Clouds.An important highlight that stands out prominently is the ability to perform product feature function upgrade without any impact to existing business workloads – is the single most important element when applying consistent user experience to both private and public deployment of cloud.Also known as smooth upgrade, when the process is being carried out, it has three major characteristics: business users are unaware of the upgrade, no data migration is required, and no service disruption. This means that all business activities running in the cloud, including the operations of the cloud platform continue as per normal during product upgrading i.e. just like a new energy vehicle being driven as usual when its system is being upgraded and the fact that you can make a call or use applications on your smartphone when you are upgrading its operating systems platform.The product portfolio belonging to EasyStack’s new-generation private Cloud not only offer public cloud like consumer based experience, but also meets stringent yet complex requirements in the context of private deployment. In the foreseeable future, the product will be further enhanced to cater to customer requirements with extended scenarios support, including integrating third-party solutions and leveraging the open source ecosystem with EasyStack innovative EVOLVABLE capability, thus contributing progressively and rapidly to the development of the global private cloud market. Now Move to Evolvable Private Cloud Product ECS, Courtesy EasyStack Sudipto GhoshJuly 11, 2019, 9:20 pmJuly 11, 2019 Cloud computingCloud ECSCloud Experiencecustomer dataEasyStackEVOLVABLEIBM RedhatInfrastructure as a ServiceNewsOracle CloudPublic Cloud Previous ArticleiSON Xperiences Commended by Frost & Sullivan for its Rapid Growth in the African BPO MarketNext ArticleSynup Announces New Executive Hires and Expansion in 2019last_img read more


first_imgImage Credit: Lori Werhane By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJan 9 2019A new study has shown that adults with ASD are better at detecting relief and regret on the faces of others compared to those who do not have the condition. The results of the study were published in the latest issue of the journal Autism Research. Source:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/aur.2056center_img Lead author Heather Ferguson, from the department of neurolinguistics, semantics and syntax at the University of Kent, in a statement said, “We have shown that, contrary to previous research that has highlighted the difficulties adults with autism experience with empathy and perspective-taking, people with autism possess previously overlooked strengths in processing emotions.”Related StoriesAtypical eating behaviors may indicate autismTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTProblem behaviors may provide clues on gastrointestinal issues in children with autismThe team looked at 48 adult participants – 24 with and 24 without ASD. The participants were given to read a story about a person who experiences regret or relief. They used eye-tracking methods to assess the reactions of the participants. In the story the protagonist or the person makes a decision that leads to a good or a bad outcome and the mood at the end of the result is summer up as “happy or annoyed”. If the final emotion did not match up to the narrative of the story, the participants were confused and either spent more time re-reading the passage or looked back at the previous sentences for clues. This meant that the participant was trying to make sense of the story that seemed absurd. For example one of the stories said in details how a woman decided to buy the shoes she loved and then she was annoyed. The ey tracking helped the team detect the emotional and neurological responses to the story.The team explained that most of the participants could predict the end of the story saying if the protagonist would be relieved or feel regret. This is called “counterfactual thinking”. There have been studies showing that people with ASD have a disrupted counterfactual thinking. This study refutes those findings. The researchers found that people with ASD were somehow better than those without in this form of thinking.Authors conclude, “Thus, our findings reveal that adults with ASD can employ sophisticated processes to adopt someone else’s perspective, and use this in real-time as the reference for future processing… These findings suggest that the previously observed difficulty with complex counterfactual emotions may be tied specifically to difficulties with the explicit expression of emotions rather than any difficulty experiencing them implicitly at a neurocognitive level.”last_img read more


first_imgThe findings reinforce the idea that a versatile and healthy diet plays a key role, and even has an independent role in health. If we can intervene in deviant eating behaviours, such as food neophobia, already in childhood or youth. This will help to prevent potential future health problems early on.Hereditary factors and our genotype only determine our predisposition to food neophobia. Early childhood education and care and lifestyle guidance in adulthood can provide support in the development of a diverse diet.”Research Professor Markus Perola from the National Institute for Health and Welfare Source:National Institute for Health and WelfareJournal reference:Perola, M. et al. (2019) Food neophobia associates with poorer dietary quality, metabolic risk factors, and increased disease outcome risk in population-based cohorts in a metabolomics study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqz100. Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 18 2019Food neophobia, or fear of new foods, may lead to poorer dietary quality, increase the risk factors associated with chronic diseases, and thus increase the risk of developing lifestyle diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes.These are some of the findings of a study conducted by the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare, the University of Helsinki, and the University of Tartu in Estonia.Food neophobia is an eating behavior trait in which a person refuses to taste and eat food items or foods they are not familiar with. The study examined the independent impact of eating behavior, and especially food neophobia, on dietary quality as well as lifestyle diseases and their risk factors. So far, little research has been carried out on this area.The study monitored individuals aged between 25 and 74 years in the Finnish FINRISK and DILGOM cohorts and an Estonian biobank cohort during a seven-year follow-up.Food neophobia is hereditaryFood neophobia has been observed to be a strongly hereditary trait: twin studies have found that up to 78% of it may be hereditary. The trait can be easily measured using the FNS questionnaire (Food Neophobia Scale), which contains ten questions charting the respondent’s eating behavior. The FNS questionnaire was also used to measure and quantify the fear of new foods in this study.Food neophobia is common in children and older persons, in particular. Few studies have so far been carried out on food neophobia in the adult population.Traits similar to food neophobia, including picky and fussy eating, also occur in different age groups in the population. These eating behaviors may also have a significant impact on dietary quality and subsequently health. As different traits associated with eating behaviors have overlapping characteristics making a clear-cut distinction between them is challenging.Food neophobia has independent health impactsRelated StoriesDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesDiet and nutrition influence microbiome in colonic mucosaUTHealth researchers investigate how to reduce stress-driven alcohol useThe study found that food neophobia is linked to poorer dietary quality: for example, the intake of fiber, protein and monounsaturated fatty acids may be lower and the intake of saturated fat and salt greater in food neophobic individuals.Additionally, a significant association was found between food neophobia and adverse fatty acid profile and increased level of inflammatory markers in blood. Subsequently, food neophobia also increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases or type 2 diabetes.It is often thought that the impacts of eating behavior and diet on health are mainly mediated through weight changes alone. In this study, however, the impacts of food neophobia emerged independently regardless of weight, age, socioeconomic status, gender or living area.Your parents were right: you should always try all foods!last_img read more


Cambridge Analytica’s acting chief executive, Alexander Tayler, said Friday that he was sorry that SCL Elections, an affiliate of his company, “licensed Facebook data and derivatives from a research company (Global Science Research) that had not received consent from most respondents” in 2014.”The company believed that the data had been obtained in line with Facebook’s terms of service and data protection laws,” Tayler said.His statement said the data was deleted in 2015 at Facebook’s request, and denied that any of the Facebook data that Cambridge Analytica obtained was used in the work it did on the 2016 U.S. election. Britain’s information regulator said Saturday it was assessing evidence gathered from a raid on the office of data mining firm Cambridge Analytica, part of an investigation into alleged misuse of personal information by political campaigns and social media companies like Facebook. Information Commissioner’s Office enforcement officers work inside the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London after a High Court judge granted a search warrant, Friday March 23, 2018. The investigation into alleged misuse of personal information continues Friday to determine whether Cambridge Analytica improperly used data from some 50 million Facebook users to target voters with ads and political messages. (Yui Mok/PA via AP) © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Information Commissioner’s Office enforcement officers work inside the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London after a High Court judge granted a search warrant, Friday March 23, 2018. The investigation into alleged misuse of personal information continues Friday to determine whether Cambridge Analytica improperly used data from some 50 million Facebook users to target voters with ads and political messages. (Yui Mok/PA via AP) Enforcement officers working for Information Commissioner arrive at the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London after a High Court judge granted a search warrant, Friday March 23, 2018. The investigation into alleged misuse of personal information continues Friday to determine whether Cambridge Analytica improperly used data from some 50 million Facebook users to target voters with ads and political messages. (Yui Mok/PA via AP) Explore further Enforcement officers working for Information Commissioner arrive at the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London after a High Court judge granted a search warrant, Friday March 23, 2018. The investigation into alleged misuse of personal information continues Friday to determine whether Cambridge Analytica improperly used data from some 50 million Facebook users to target voters with ads and political messages. (Yui Mok/PA via AP) The scene at a window as Information Commissioner’s Office enforcement officers work inside the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London after a High Court judge granted a search warrant, Friday March 23, 2018. The investigation into alleged misuse of personal information continues Friday to determine whether Cambridge Analytica improperly used data from some 50 million Facebook users to target voters with ads and political messages. (Yui Mok/PA via AP) Information Commissioner’s Office enforcement officers work inside the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London after a High Court judge granted a search warrant, Friday March 23, 2018. The investigation into alleged misuse of personal information continues Friday to determine whether Cambridge Analytica improperly used data from some 50 million Facebook users to target voters with ads and political messages. (Yui Mok/PA via AP) More than a dozen investigators from the Information Commissioner’s Office entered the company’s central London office late Friday, shortly after a High Court judge granted a warrant. The investigators were seen leaving the premises early Saturday after spending about seven hours searching the office.The regulator said it will “consider the evidence before deciding the next steps and coming to any conclusions.””This is one part of a larger investigation by the ICO into the use of personal data and analytics by political campaigns, parties, social media companies and other commercial actors,” it said.Authorities in Britain as well as the U.S. are investigating Cambridge Analytica over allegations the firm improperly obtained data from 50 million Facebook users and used it to manipulate elections, including the 2016 White House race and the 2016 Brexit vote in Britain.Both Cambridge Analytica and Facebook deny wrongdoing.The data firm suspended its CEO Alexander Nix this week after Britain’s Channel 4 News broadcast footage that appeared to show Nix suggesting tactics like entrapment or bribery that his company could use to discredit politicians. The footage also showed Nix saying Cambridge Analytica played a major role in securing Donald Trump’s victory in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Enforcement officers working for Information Commissioner’s Office enter the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London after a High Court judge granted a search warrant, Friday March 23, 2018. The investigation into alleged misuse of personal information continues Friday to determine whether Cambridge Analytica improperly used data from some 50 million Facebook users to target voters with ads and political messages. (Yui Mok/PA via AP) Citation: UK watchdog evaluates evidence from Cambridge Analytica (2018, March 25) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-uk-watchdog-evidence-cambridge-analytica.html UK seeking warrant to access Cambridge Analytica servers (Update) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more


A miniature blood vessel, formed on agarose/gelatin hydrogel. Green represents VE-cadherin, a protein that glues cells together, and blue is nuclei. Credit: Yongzhi Qiu Citation: Mini-vessel device probes blood interactions in malaria, sickle cell disease (2018, April 30) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-mini-vessel-device-probes-blood-interactions.html Biomedical engineers have established a model system for studying these problems, which has potential for use in other cardiovascular diseases as well. The system builds a network of artificial blood vessels, based on familiar “hydrogel” materials that dissolve with heat: gelatin and agarose, a sugar derived from seaweed.The results were recently published by Nature Biomedical Engineering.”The key technological innovation here is that our hydrogel can keep these vessels growing for weeks to months, which is much longer than standard approaches,” says senior author Wilbur Lam, MD, Ph.D. “With this system, we can study not only how vessels respond to aspects of disease but also how well the vessels will heal over time once those insults are removed.”Lam is assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine and in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.Working with Lam, instructor Yongzhi Qiu, Ph.D. and colleagues constructed a hydrogel-based microfluidic device, with branching vessels roughly 20 micrometers across. The device can then be coated by endothelial cells, which line blood vessels, and connected to a pump. An advantage of using hydrogels, the authors write, is that hydrogels are not as stiff as solid polymers, and thus respond in a more physiological relevant manner to changes in fluid flow.Once fully assembled, the endothelial cells weaken their barriers in response to inflammatory molecules such as TNF-alpha and then heal afterwards.The researchers also tested responses to heme, a component of hemoglobin formed when red blood cells break open, and they tested the effects of occlusion-prone red blood cells from sickle cell disease patients and red blood cells infected by Plasmodium parasites.The model system could be used to further dissect the effects of red blood cells vs other cells and inflammatory molecules, and to screen for drugs that could prevent damage to blood vessels, the researchers say. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Nature Biomedical Engineering In diseases such as malaria and sickle cell disease, red blood cells break down, with harmful effects on the rest of the body – particularly the lining of small blood vessels. Provided by Emory University Engineers create miniature self-sealing ‘wound’ More information: Yongzhi Qiu et al. Microvasculature-on-a-chip for the long-term study of endothelial barrier dysfunction and microvascular obstruction in disease, Nature Biomedical Engineering (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41551-018-0224-z read more


first_img © 2019 AFP Rideshare drivers for Uber and Lyft stage a strike and protest at the LAX International Airport, over what they say are unfair wages in Los Angeles, California Citation: Rideshare drivers strike as Uber poised to go public (2019, May 9) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-rideshare-drivers-uber-poised.html Lyft’s loss in the past quarter widened to $1.1 billion, according to its first financial report as a public company.Revenue for California-based Lyft nearly doubled from a year earlier to $776 million and the number of active riders grew to over 20.5 million. Uber is expected to launch its initial public offering (IPO) on Friday at an estimated valuation of some $90 billion.The launch will be a major milestone for the company, which has raised billions and disrupted the taxi industry in cities around the world.It will also come in the rear-view mirror of a troubled market debut for Uber’s largest US rival Lyft, which has lost more than 15 percent of its value since its March IPO.Strikes that took place Wednesday highlighted a dilemma for rideshare firms, which have faced challenges from regulators and traditional taxi operators for using a business model relying on independent contractors.One group protested outside the New York Stock Exchange, where Uber is set to list shares, with some signs reading “Invest in our lives—Not their stocks.”Similar actions took place in Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Diego, Washington and in Uber’s home town, San Francisco.Protests were held in Britain as well with drivers in London, Birmingham, Nottingham and Glasgow called on to log off apps and demonstrate outside Uber offices, according to the Independent Workers’ Union of Great Britain.Rideshare companies maintain that drivers are able to thrive and maintain work flexibility, and that their business model would not work if drivers were treated as wage-based employees.Uber and Lyft did not immediately comment on the job actions.”While we aim to provide an earnings opportunity comparable to that available in retail, wholesale, or restaurant services or other similar work, we continue to experience dissatisfaction with our platform from a significant number of drivers,” Uber said in a filing with securities regulators.”In particular, as we aim to reduce driver incentives to improve our financial performance, we expect driver dissatisfaction will generally increase.”Lyft shares skidUber’s debut as a public company will follow the rocky market debut for Lyft. Uber aiming for stock market debut value of up to $90 bn: report Explore further Lyft said its losses deepened as a result of $894 million in costs that included stock-based compensation and related tax expenses in connection with its IPO.Lyft shares finished the formal trading day Wednesday down 10.8 percent to $52.91.Uber last month pulled back on its ambitious valuation target, while still pricing its share offering in a range that would make it one of the largest tech market debuts in recent years.The ride-hailing firm said in a securities filing it would sell 207 million shares in a range of $44 to $50 dollars, raising up to $10 billion.That would give Uber a market value of between $74 billion and $84 billion. Some media reports said the figure could be up to $90 billion accounting for restricted stock options.But the pricing target—still subject to change—fell below earlier ambitions of a valuation of more than $100 billion for the firm operating in some 700 cities around the world.Uber will trade on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker “UBER” sometime next month.”We continue to view Lyft as a one-trick pony domestic ride sharing player and ‘little brother’ to Uber,” Wedbush Securities equity research managing director Daniel Ives said Thursday in a note to investors.Uber is “paving a similar road” to what Amazon did to e-commerce and Facebook did for social media, he contended, expressing confidence in the company.Amazon of transportUber envisions becoming the “Amazon of transportation” in a future where people share instead of owning vehicles.If all goes to plan, commuters could ride an e-scooter to a transit station, take a train then grab an e-bike, ride share or e-scooter at the arriving station to complete a journey using the Uber smartphone app.Of course, shared car rides would be an option, eventually driven by computers instead of humans.Uber is also taking to the sky with an Elevate project to have electric aircraft carry people between “skyports,” taking off and landing vertically.Uber’s platform moves cargo as well as people, with a “Freight” service that connects truckers with shippers in a way similar to how drivers connect with people seeking rides.Uber is also seeing growing success with an “Eats” service that lets drivers make money delivering meals ordered from restaurants. Thousands of Uber and Lyft drivers turned off their apps in a US-wide strike Wednesday over pay and working conditions, casting a shadow over this week’s keenly anticipated Wall Street debut of ride-hailing leader Uber. Members of the Independent Drivers Guild rallied at Uber and Lyft headquarters in New York as part of a protest to press demands for better pay and working conditions for the independent contractors This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more