first_imgFlorentin Pogba has been handed a trial at Spanish second-tier outfit Elche.The central defender, 28, formerly of Saint-Etienne and, most recently, Turkish side Genclerbirligi, has been a free agent since the expiry of his contract last summer.One of two older brothers to Manchester United midfielder Paul Pogba, Florentin has plenty to offer Elche in terms of experience, having made 193 senior appearances in all competitions, including the first and second divisions of France, as well as the Europa League. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Unlike his younger sibling, however, he represents Guinea at international level rather than France.Elche announced on their official website that the centre-back would train with the club for a week to give manager Pacheta a closer look at his qualities and decide if he would be a worthwhile addition to the squad.The club are languishing in 17th in the Segunda Division, just a point above the relegation zone. They have the joint-fourth worst defensive record in the league, having conceded 26 goals in 20 games, something they hope their potential new addition could help to combat.Florentin’s twin brother, Mathias, recently spoke out against Mourinho’s treatment of their younger brother, citing the United midfielder’s recent strong performances as evidence that he was being mismanaged by the Portuguese.The World Cup winner had been criticised for his performances this season, and Mourinho dropped him to the bench for the Red Devils’ Premier League fixtures against Arsenal, Fulham and Liverpool.However, since the arrival of interim boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, the France international has scored four goals and registered three assists in just four league games, playing the full 90 minutes in each one and he looks like a player revived.Mathias plays as a striker for Tours FC in the third tier of French football, having joined on a free transfer himself last summer, after a year out of the game following the expiry of his contract at Dutch outfit Sparta Rotterdam.last_img read more


About 30,000 families in 58 municipalities in Nicaragua’s ‘Dry Corridor,’ the area of the country most affected by droughts and climate change, are expected to benefit from a financial agreement between the United Nations International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and Nicaragua to boost sustainable agricultural production.“In recent months, we have seen how bad things can be, not only for small farmers, but for the entire population living in the area,” said Ladislao Rubio, IFAD’s Country Programme Manager for Nicaragua, noting that the rise in temperatures caused by the El Niño phenomenon made agriculture almost impossible, leaving more than 3.5 million people in Central America dependent on food aid to survive. “The only way to avoid these food crises is to build small farmers’ resilience to climate change by investing in climate-smart agriculture,” he added.Regional falling agriculture production has led to food insecurity and particularly a decline in household incomes and has stretched rural families and indigenous people’s resilience.With the investment, the UN agency, through the Dry Corridor Rural Family Sustainable Development Project (NICAVIDA) project, addresses the situation of Nicaraguan smallholders living in the Dry Corridor, a strip of land in which with 52 per cent of soils are overused and 40 per cent is strongly or severely eroded. “Life in the Dry Corridor was never easy, but climate change has made things even worse and, unless we give small farmers living there the tools they need to adapt to increasingly dry and unpredictable weather, they will not be able to cope,” said Mr. Rubio. The NICAVIDA project aims to ensure small farmers’ access to nutritious food and an adequate diet and increase their capacity for natural resource management and adaptation to climate change by promoting the links between economic diversification, productive transformation, environmental protection and family nutrition. IFAD, together with regional partners will, among others, focus on the needs of communities in terms of infrastructure, road improvement and investments in public services that will improve the living standards of the Corridor’s rural families and indigenous peoples, and connect them to markets. The term Dry Corridor defines a group of ecosystems in the eco-region of dry tropical forests in Central America covering the lowlands of the Pacific coastal area, and most of central pre-mountain region of El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and parts of Costa Rica and Panama.The total cost of the project is $48.5 million, of which IFAD is providing $20.5 million. The other contributors are: the Central American Bank for Economic Integration ($15 million), the Government of Nicaragua ($6 million) and the beneficiaries themselves ($7 million). About 191,380 households benefit from IFAD’s involvement in the Central American country, and the NICAVIDA project is one of the agency’s three ongoing operations. IFAD also sponsors the Agricultural, Fishery and Forestry Productive Systems Development Programme project in North Atlantic Autonomous Region and South Atlantic Autonomous Region Indigenous Territories as well as Adapting to Markets and Climate Change Project. By assisting with projects such as this storage system for irrigation water, FAO is supporting the countries of the Dry Corridor in Central America in addressing disaster risks that affect agriculture and food and nutrition. Photo: FAO/Honduras read more